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luv
05-29-2012, 01:15 PM
So, my laptop at home will only give me limited access, which basically means no internet access. I've tried resetting the connection, making sure it automatically determines the IP address, rebooting, disconnecting and reconnecting the router, and rebooting again. Hell, I even tried a system restore. Still nothing. There are multiple laptops in the house, along with a tower, and mine is the only one having issues. I know jack about hardware. What else do I check. It's a Gateway that's probably about three or four years old. I'm not at home, so any other specs that anyone asks me about will have to be looked up later.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Fish
05-29-2012, 02:20 PM
What do you mean when you say it will only give you "limited access"? Does the computer tell you that in a popup window or what?

Do you know if it's giving you an IP address? When you go to Control Panel\Networking\Wireless Internet\Details, what does it say for the IP address?

luv
05-29-2012, 02:34 PM
What do you mean when you say it will only give you "limited access"? Does the computer tell you that in a popup window or what?

Do you know if it's giving you an IP address? When you go to Control Panel\Networking\Wireless Internet\Details, what does it say for the IP address?

The internet icon on the task bar has a yellow triangle with an exclamation point in it. When I hover over it, it says limited access. When I go to my Network & Sharing. It says I'm not connected to the internet. I'll have to see what it's saying my IP address is when I get home from work.

Dartgod
05-29-2012, 02:40 PM
Limited access is probably a 169.254.x.x address which means it cannot get a DHCP address from the router or modem.

loochy
05-29-2012, 02:42 PM
Did you pay the bill?

edit: n/m, you said the other machines can connect

Fish
05-29-2012, 02:43 PM
OK. That message is pretty meaningless as far as diagnosing anything. See what it says for the IP address. And take a look at the other working laptops in the house, and see what they have for an IP format. It should be in the format of something like 192.168.X.X or 10.0.X.X, where X could be any random number(doesn't matter).

The Gateway laptop should be getting an IP address very similar to the others. As in, if the other machines have IPs of 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3, the Gateway should be getting something like 192.168.1.4. But just see if it's similar. If it is, that means it's getting the right info from the router. If not, then it's not being seen by the router.

Also, what happens when you attach a network cable to the laptop? I assume that the network cable is plugged into the tower computer and it's not using wireless. What happens when you unplug the network cable from the tower, and plug it into the Gateway? Does the internet work then? Give it a few minutes after you plug in the network cable to test. See if you get internet from the network cable...

luv
05-29-2012, 02:58 PM
OK. That message is pretty meaningless as far as diagnosing anything. See what it says for the IP address. And take a look at the other working laptops in the house, and see what they have for an IP format. It should be in the format of something like 192.168.X.X or 10.0.X.X, where X could be any random number(doesn't matter).

The Gateway laptop should be getting an IP address very similar to the others. As in, if the other machines have IPs of 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3, the Gateway should be getting something like 192.168.1.4. But just see if it's similar. If it is, that means it's getting the right info from the router. If not, then it's not being seen by the router.

Also, what happens when you attach a network cable to the laptop? I assume that the network cable is plugged into the tower computer and it's not using wireless. What happens when you unplug the network cable from the tower, and plug it into the Gateway? Does the internet work then? Give it a few minutes after you plug in the network cable to test. See if you get internet from the network cable...

Everything in the house is wireless. The tower is not directly hooked up either.

If it is not seeing my laptop, what do I need to do? I've already tried reconnecting the router and rebooting my machine. That typically works, but it hasn't this time.

Fish
05-29-2012, 03:34 PM
Everything in the house is wireless. The tower is not directly hooked up either.

If it is not seeing my laptop, what do I need to do? I've already tried reconnecting the router and rebooting my machine. That typically works, but it hasn't this time.

Well bummer. That would have helped with troubleshooting. But oh well.

What you need to do is difficult to answer at this point. It could be a whole host of different things. The wireless adapter in the laptop might need a driver update. The laptop's TCP/IP settings might be configured for a static IP, instead of configured for DHCP. The wireless adapter might be configured to only work on certain wireless speeds, and the router is configured to a different speed setting. The router might be configured to only allow access for certain devices, set by MAC address. It could have some sort of virus or malware that might have changed settings to use a Proxy server. That's just a short list.

Get home and check the IP address, and see what is being assigned. That's the first step.

Has this Gateway laptop ever worked on your wireless network? Has it ever worked on any wireless network? What OS is it running?

luv
05-29-2012, 03:42 PM
Well bummer. That would have helped with troubleshooting. But oh well.

What you need to do is difficult to answer at this point. It could be a whole host of different things. The wireless adapter in the laptop might need a driver update. The laptop's TCP/IP settings might be configured for a static IP, instead of configured for DHCP. The wireless adapter might be configured to only work on certain wireless speeds, and the router is configured to a different speed setting. The router might be configured to only allow access for certain devices, set by MAC address. It could have some sort of virus or malware that might have changed settings to use a Proxy server. That's just a short list.

Get home and check the IP address, and see what is being assigned. That's the first step.

Has this Gateway laptop ever worked on your wireless network? Has it ever worked on any wireless network? What OS is it running?

It's got the ever hated Windows Vista. Ugh.
And yes, it was working fine up until Sunday night. I unplugged my laptop, took it downstairs to hook it up to the printer to print something off, brought it back upstairs, plugged it back in and left. When I got home and went to get online, nothing.

Fish
05-29-2012, 03:58 PM
It's got the ever hated Windows Vista. Ugh.
And yes, it was working fine up until Sunday night. I unplugged my laptop, took it downstairs to hook it up to the printer to print something off, brought it back upstairs, plugged it back in and left. When I got home and went to get online, nothing.

Unplugged it from what? Just the power? If so, that shouldn't matter. But please note... You should never leave a laptop plugged into AC power for long periods of time. Unless you really enjoy purchasing replacement batteries for some reason. Leaving a laptop plugged in after the battery has charged to 100% is terrible practice, and will reduce the overall life of the battery by a huge degree.

But anyway... Unplugging it and moving it shouldn't have made any difference if it was previously working. Did you restart it during that time? Any Windows updates installed? Are you sure there's not a physical button on the laptop that turns wifi on and off? It might have a little antenna icon or something. I've seen that issue on occasion.

You might go to Control Panel\System\Device Manager\Network Adapters and see if there's a red "X" or a yellow "!" on top of the icon for the wireless adapter.

Other than that, check and see what the IP says when you get home...

luv
05-29-2012, 04:35 PM
Unplugged it from what? Just the power? If so, that shouldn't matter. But please note... You should never leave a laptop plugged into AC power for long periods of time. Unless you really enjoy purchasing replacement batteries for some reason. Leaving a laptop plugged in after the battery has charged to 100% is terrible practice, and will reduce the overall life of the battery by a huge degree.

But anyway... Unplugging it and moving it shouldn't have made any difference if it was previously working. Did you restart it during that time? Any Windows updates installed? Are you sure there's not a physical button on the laptop that turns wifi on and off? It might have a little antenna icon or something. I've seen that issue on occasion.

You might go to Control Panel\System\Device Manager\Network Adapters and see if there's a red "X" or a yellow "!" on top of the icon for the wireless adapter.

Other than that, check and see what the IP says when you get home...

Yeah, my dad's laptop has the physical button, and he's had that happen before. I've not found any such button on mine. And yes, it was just the power, which is why I can't figure out what the problem is. I'll check the IP address once I'm home in a little while.

RippedmyFlesh
05-29-2012, 04:48 PM
Is your modem a modem and router? If the modem and router are 2 seperate pieces you have to power cycle the modem.
Doing it just on a router if it is seperate from modem will do you no good.
Make sure your antivirus software isn't expired. If it is you may have to re-install the wireless adapter (software wise not physically re-install).

Guru
05-29-2012, 05:15 PM
Will it connect on any other networks?

luv
05-30-2012, 08:10 AM
Will it connect on any other networks?


Thought of that, but all of the other networks near my house are secured.

luv
05-30-2012, 08:12 AM
Here's what I got.

Physical Address: 00.21.6B.10.51.E0
Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address: 169.254.3.111
Ipv4 Subnet Mask: 255.255.0.0

WV
05-30-2012, 08:17 AM
My Gateway laptop is newer, but the wireless button located along the top isn't a physical button but is a touch sensitive button. Is your little antenna icon lit up blue?

luv
05-30-2012, 08:19 AM
My Gateway laptop is newer, but the wireless button located along the top isn't a physical button but is a touch sensitive button. Is your little antenna icon lit up blue?

I'll check it again when I head home for lunch. Where is your touch sensitive button located?

WV
05-30-2012, 08:20 AM
I'll check it again when I head home for lunch. Where is your touch sensitive button located?

Above the keyboard with all the other buttons....ie sound, caps lock.

luv
05-30-2012, 08:21 AM
Above the keyboard with all the other buttons....ie sound, caps lock.

I'll make sure to check it again. I'm thinking it has to be something that simple, actually. Just something I overlooked.

RippedmyFlesh
05-31-2012, 05:02 PM
Even if other machines can connect if you don't power cycle the modem you are wasting your time.
It takes 2 minutes and I have seen people do system restores not connect yet connected
after power cycling the modem.
If a power cycle is needed nothing short of that will fix it. Nothing..not system restore,re-installing nic card, nothing. Try it it's easy fast and doesn't do damage.

ElGringo
05-31-2012, 05:08 PM
Something that worked for me on an XP machine recently, open device manager and remove the wireless card completely from there, reboot the machine and let it reinstall the wireless drivers and try again....not saying it will work but is an option, and since you have other computers that can connect you can always redownload drivers from one of those and move them onto the laptop.

luv
06-01-2012, 08:10 AM
No matter what I've one at home, nothing has worked. I brought my laptop in to work today, and I'm able to get on our network just fine.

Oh, and I've tried everything that's been suggested in this thread.

Count Alex's Wins
06-01-2012, 08:19 AM
I bet if you throw Windows 7 on that laptop it will completely resolve the issue.

luv
06-01-2012, 08:22 AM
I bet if you throw Windows 7 on that laptop it will completely resolve the issue.

I would love to get Windows 7. At this point, I think I'll just get a new laptop, which will come with Windows 7. I've been wanting something a little more light weight anyway. Maybe sometime this summer.

Count Alex's Wins
06-01-2012, 08:28 AM
It's $100.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B004Q0T10A/ref=sr_1_6_olp?ie=UTF8&qid=1338557297&sr=8-6&condition=new

RippedmyFlesh
06-01-2012, 10:06 AM
I bet if you throw Windows 7 on that laptop it will completely resolve the issue.

If that is true then wiping and reloading XP would also work.

ReynardMuldrake
06-01-2012, 10:28 AM
No matter what I've one at home, nothing has worked. I brought my laptop in to work today, and I'm able to get on our network just fine.

Oh, and I've tried everything that's been suggested in this thread.

Is your home network password protected? You can get that 'limited access' status with some authentication issues. I would disconnect and reconnect to wireless. I would also update the drivers for the wireless devices. Older drivers can have issues with newer protocols like WPA2, which could explain why it works at another location [different authentication type.]

Also, you can disable the password on the router temporarily to test it, just to rule out an authentication issue.

Bearcat
06-01-2012, 11:48 AM
No matter what I've one at home, nothing has worked. I brought my laptop in to work today, and I'm able to get on our network just fine.

Oh, and I've tried everything that's been suggested in this thread.

Remove the wireless network from your laptop (might as well do it now instead of having to disable it first when you get home), and then see if it'll connect. If it's password protected, you'll need to enter the password again.

http://www.ehow.com/how_6131251_remove-wireless-network-windows-xp.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDT0pLQfyvg

Bearcat
06-01-2012, 12:06 PM
Unplugged it from what? Just the power? If so, that shouldn't matter. But please note... You should never leave a laptop plugged into AC power for long periods of time. Unless you really enjoy purchasing replacement batteries for some reason. Leaving a laptop plugged in after the battery has charged to 100% is terrible practice, and will reduce the overall life of the battery by a huge degree.


FWIW, I've read this is a myth, unless it's a nickel-based battery... lithium batteries don't have memory effects, and I've even read that it's recommended to keep them charged and to not constantly go from 100% charged to < 10% and back.

luv
06-01-2012, 01:20 PM
Is your home network password protected? You can get that 'limited access' status with some authentication issues. I would disconnect and reconnect to wireless. I would also update the drivers for the wireless devices. Older drivers can have issues with newer protocols like WPA2, which could explain why it works at another location [different authentication type.]

Also, you can disable the password on the router temporarily to test it, just to rule out an authentication issue.

I really don't want to do anything to the router, as other computers in the house are working just fine. I do something to fuck that up and dad may kill me...lol.

Fish
06-01-2012, 02:16 PM
FWIW, I've read this is a myth, unless it's a nickel-based battery... lithium batteries don't have memory effects, and I've even read that it's recommended to keep them charged and to not constantly go from 100% charged to < 10% and back.

It's not a myth at all. But sadly, there is a great deal of conflicting information on it. I did experimentation in college on this affect. And I've got 10+ years of observations of battery usage that also supports it. I've monitored the usage of several dozen users, and how they approach their charging behavior. Ranging from users that leave the battery constantly plugged in, to those who are very specific about unplugging AC power after the battery is charged. I've even recorded and compared the battery cycle counts of cases at both ends of the spectrum. And without a doubt, there is a huge degree of difference in battery life between the two charging methodologies.

Keeping it charged at 100% is the worst thing you can do for a battery.

Li-ion does not need to be fully charged, as is the case with lead acid, nor is it desirable to do so. In fact, it is better not to fully charge, because high voltages stresses the battery. Choosing a lower voltage threshold, or eliminating the saturation charge altogether, prolongs battery life but this reduces the runtime. Since the consumer market promotes maximum runtime, these chargers go for maximum capacity rather than extended service life.

Some lower-cost consumer chargers may use the simplified “charge-and-run” method that charges a lithium-ion battery in one hour or less without going to the Stage 2 saturation charge. “Ready” appears when the battery reaches the voltage threshold at Stage 1. Since the state-of-charge (SoC) at this point is only about 85 percent, the user may complain of short runtime, not knowing that the charger is to blame. Many warranty batteries are being replaced for this reason, and this phenomenon is especially common in the cellular industry.

Avoiding full charge has benefits, and some manufacturers set the charge threshold lower on purpose to prolong battery life.

Li-ion cannot absorb overcharge, and when fully charged the charge current must be cut off. A continuous trickle charge would cause plating of metallic lithium, and this could compromise safety. To minimize stress, keep the lithium-ion battery at the 4.20V/cell peak voltage as short a time as possible.
Once the charge is terminated, the battery voltage begins to drop, and this eases the voltage stress. Over time, the open-circuit voltage will settle to between 3.60 and 3.90V/cell. Note that a Li-ion battery that received a fully saturated charge will keep the higher voltage longer than one that was fast-charged and terminated at the voltage threshold without a saturation charge.
If a lithium-ion battery must be left in the charger for operational readiness, some chargers apply a brief topping charge to compensate for the small self-discharge the battery and its protective circuit consume. The charger may kick in when the open-circuit voltage drops to 4.05V/cell and turn off again at a high 4.20V/cell. Chargers made for operational readiness, or standby mode, often let the battery voltage drop to 4.00V/cell and recharge to only 4.05V/cell instead of the full 4.20V/cell. This reduces voltage-related stress and prolongs battery life.

Some portable devices sit in a charge cradle in the on position. The current drawn through the device is called the parasitic load and can distort the charge cycle. Battery manufacturers advise against parasitic load because it induces mini-cycles. The battery is continuously being discharged to 4.20V/cell and then charged by the device. The stress level on the battery is especially high because the cycles occur at the 4.20V/cell threshold.


It comes down to the fact that while on the charger at all times with the battery charged, the battery is operating at peak cell voltage all the time. Which is the most unstable and volatile state possible. Being in that state all the time reduces the overall battery life by a huge degree. It's always best to keep the battery between 10-95% charge.

Here's more technical info if you're interested: http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries

http://www.powerstream.com/li.htm

Bearcat
06-01-2012, 03:19 PM
It's not a myth at all. But sadly, there is a great deal of conflicting information on it. I did experimentation in college on this affect. And I've got 10+ years of observations of battery usage that also supports it. I've monitored the usage of several dozen users, and how they approach their charging behavior. Ranging from users that leave the battery constantly plugged in, to those who are very specific about unplugging AC power after the battery is charged. I've even recorded and compared the battery cycle counts of cases at both ends of the spectrum. And without a doubt, there is a huge degree of difference in battery life between the two charging methodologies.

Keeping it charged at 100% is the worst thing you can do for a battery.

It comes down to the fact that while on the charger at all times with the battery charged, the battery is operating at peak cell voltage all the time. Which is the most unstable and volatile state possible. Being in that state all the time reduces the overall battery life by a huge degree. It's always best to keep the battery between 10-95% charge.

Here's more technical info if you're interested: http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries

http://www.powerstream.com/li.htm

I'll check it out later, but yes, there's so much conflicting information, doing your own experiments might be the best way to figure it out. I tend to leave mine plugged in one day then let it run down the next day and I've never had to buy a 2nd battery for a laptop... and with the exception of a laptop I had for over 5 years, they've always lasted at least an hour or two. I think the battery in my laptop will only last about an hour and a half, but I've owned it for almost 2.5 years. I've read you're not supposed to leave cell phones charging over night either, but I do it every night to a phone I've owned for a couple of years, and haven't noticed any problems. But, that's just my experience, and I don't rely on my laptop batteries much at all.

luv
06-01-2012, 05:20 PM
Well, instead of disconnecting the router from the modem, I unplugged the modem from the wall. That worked. I knew it would be something simple.

Setsuna
06-01-2012, 07:26 PM
Pressing your wireless button doesn't make the limited connectivity come up on your taskbar. It completely disables any wireless connection. Dummies.

RippedmyFlesh
06-02-2012, 01:57 PM
Is your modem a modem and router? If the modem and router are 2 seperate pieces you have to power cycle the modem.


Post 12 :shake:

Setsuna
06-02-2012, 03:29 PM
Post 12 :shake:

LOL you're calling yourself out? Impressive.

loochy
06-02-2012, 05:47 PM
LOL you're calling yourself out? Impressive.

He probably finds it odd that he offered the correct and simplest solution, yet it went ignored for 3 days.

luv
06-02-2012, 08:15 PM
Post 12 :shake:

Just read back. Must have completely overlooked it. Many thanks!

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