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whoman69
06-06-2012, 04:42 PM
I know its hard to say that you respect a politician when much of what they do is obscured by their own spin team, but who is the politician you most felt a connection to, someone trying to help amongs the wolves?

For me the answer is William Proxmire, of Golden Fleece award fame. I don't agree with everything he did, for example attitude towards NASA, but overall I like what he stood for. He holds the record for most consecutive roll calls voted, breaking the previous record by 345% with more than 10k votes. He worked for more than 20 years to pass Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, finally succeeding in 1986. He spoke out against the Vietnam war. He spoke out against McCarthy after taking over his seat calling him a "disgrace to Wisconsin, to the Senate, and to America." He understood that to bring spending under control, there isn't just one button you can push to solve everything.

We could use a few William Proxmire's in the Senate right now.

|Zach|
06-06-2012, 05:04 PM
Bill Clinton.

Chocolate Hog
06-06-2012, 05:19 PM
Ron paul

Sent from my Nexus S 4G using Tapatalk 2

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 05:47 PM
Even the best ones acquire enough baggage over time that's its hard to truly admire anyone. That guy who jumped in the fountain with that stripper was kind of cool I guess.

Deberg_1990
06-06-2012, 05:55 PM
Bill Clinton.

ROFL

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 05:59 PM
Bill Clinton.

If not for that one incident :hump:, he'd be a good choice.

BucEyedPea
06-06-2012, 06:03 PM
Ron Paul since I admire the ideas of Jefferson. He is today's Jefferson.

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 06:06 PM
Ron Paul

Wow, didn't see that one coming.

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 06:13 PM
Ron Paul since I admire the ideas of Jefferson. He is today's Jefferson.

Minus the presidential election success, of course.

Didn't Jefferson send troops to fight in the Middle East? Ron Paul would not like that.

|Zach|
06-06-2012, 06:17 PM
ROFL

Use your words.

BucEyedPea
06-06-2012, 06:20 PM
Minus the presidential election success, of course.

Didn't Jefferson send troops to fight in the Middle East? Ron Paul would not like that.

Paul held office for 12 years as a congressman. This is a question thread about each person's icon. So shut up with your peanut gallery posts, troll.

Rain Man
06-06-2012, 06:23 PM
It may be media spin that recognizes that we need heroes, but I have an image of the president - any president - as a solitary guy trying to get things done while a big clown car of senators and congressmen do everything in their power to destroy progress. So regardless of the party, I tend to like the president and right now I have trouble thinking of any senator or congressman that I would pull from a burning aids tree.

Chocolate Hog
06-06-2012, 06:26 PM
Robert Taft.

BucEyedPea
06-06-2012, 06:26 PM
It may be media spin that recognizes that we need heroes, but I have an image of the president - any president - as a solitary guy trying to get things done while a big clown car of senators and congressmen do everything in their power to destroy progress. So regardless of the party, I tend to like the president and right now I have trouble thinking of any senator or congressman that I would pull from a burning aids tree.

That's the job of congress and the senate. The president was never intended to be a strong office with a hero. It's all backwards today.

banyon
06-06-2012, 06:27 PM
Minus the presidential election success, of course.

Didn't Jefferson send troops to fight in the Middle East? Ron Paul would not like that.

Don't forget making the Louisiana Purchase. Nothing explicitly in the Constitution about being able to do that.

BucEyedPea
06-06-2012, 06:28 PM
Robert Taft.

Another good one! :thumb:

banyon
06-06-2012, 06:29 PM
My answers:

Historically: Lincoln, TR
Modern: Russ Feingold, Perot, Warren Rudman

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 06:30 PM
This is a question thread. So shut up with your peanut gallery posts.

Touchy, touchy. Look, I could have made some wise-ass observation about Jefferson's slave ownership and Ron Paul's racist newsletters and being against the civil right act, but I took the high road and didn't do that.

Anyway, we're not allowed to comment? I think Ron Paul would support comments.

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 06:32 PM
Don't forget making the Louisiana Purchase. Nothing explicitly in the Constitution about being able to do that.

Stop it. Apparently, we aren't allowed to comment on RP.

|Zach|
06-06-2012, 06:36 PM
Don't forget making the Louisiana Purchase. Nothing explicitly in the Constitution about being able to do that.

LMAO

pr_capone
06-06-2012, 06:38 PM
Chris Christie - the guy just tells it like it is and seems to have the best interests of his state at heart. I sincerely hope he runs for Prez in 2016 and wish he would have done so this election instead of Romney.

BucEyedPea
06-06-2012, 06:41 PM
Touchy, touchy. Look, I could have made some wise-ass observation about Jefferson's slave ownership and Ron Paul's racist newsletters and being against the civil right act, but I took the high road and didn't do that.

Anyway, we're not allowed to comment? I think Ron Paul would support comments.

Look, the thread author asked for "our" icon—not yours. Paul is my icon for my reasons....like his voting record and integrity.
Now put up yours or shut up.

patteeu
06-06-2012, 06:49 PM
Every post in this thread that doesn't identify Dick Cheney as the icon of icons is a failure.

La literatura
06-06-2012, 07:37 PM
I admire FDR and Caesar Augustus for the reforms they enacted.

I enjoy David Brooks' political commentary. I do not like extreme ideologues. I do appreciate people who compromise and are pragmatic.

It's hard to find a more admirable group of people in politics than the Founding Fathers.

mlyonsd
06-06-2012, 07:42 PM
Winston Churchill.

Donger
06-06-2012, 07:47 PM
Washington, I suppose.

Hoover
06-06-2012, 07:57 PM
Richard Nixon and Herbert Hoover

mlyonsd
06-06-2012, 07:59 PM
Richard Nixon and Herbert HooverHoly crap. Haven't seen you in a while.

BucEyedPea
06-06-2012, 08:05 PM
Touchy, touchy. Look, I could have made some wise-ass observation about Jefferson's slave ownership and Ron Paul's racist newsletters and being against the civil right act, but I took the high road and didn't do that.

Anyway, we're not allowed to comment? I think Ron Paul would support comments.

Woosh! None of that was my point.

notorious
06-06-2012, 08:14 PM
Chris Christie - the guy just tells it like it is and seems to have the best interests of his state at heart. I sincerely hope he runs for Prez in 2016 and wish he would have done so this election instead of Romney.

This.

Easy 6
06-06-2012, 08:28 PM
I will always wish Colin Powell would've ran for president, he'd have been a great one, big clout between both aisles & around the world.

Hoover
06-06-2012, 10:14 PM
Holy crap. Haven't seen you in a while.
I've been a while, but mostly in the draft planet.

patteeu
06-06-2012, 10:24 PM
I will always wish Colin Powell would've ran for president, he'd have been a great one, big clout between both aisles & around the world.

I don't think he did a very good job at the State Department (AFAIC, it seemed to run him rather than the other way around).

Guru
06-06-2012, 10:28 PM
George Washington

Easy 6
06-06-2012, 10:41 PM
I don't think he did a very good job at the State Department (AFAIC, it seemed to run him rather than the other way around).

He has done a good job everywhere he's ever been by my reading, thats how he came to command the respect he has... does your complaint with him have anything to do with the fact that he & your icon Cheney were known to clash frequently?

patteeu
06-06-2012, 10:44 PM
He has done a good job everywhere he's ever been by my reading, thats how he came to command the respect he has... does your complaint with him have anything to do with the fact that he & your icon Cheney were known to clash frequently?

It has to do with the fact that he either didn't do a very good job running the State Department or he was disloyal to his boss, the President. If he had major policy differences with Bush, he should have resigned. Instead, his organization leaked like a sieve against his own administration and often failed to pull it's oars in the same direction as the rest of the crew.

I don't know how often he and Cheney clashed, but given the wayward nature of the State Department, it wouldn't surprise me if they did.

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 10:46 PM
It has to do with the fact that he either didn't do a very good job running the State Department or he was disloyal to his boss, the President. If he had major policy differences with Bush, he should have resigned. Instead, his organization leaked like a sieve against his own administration and often failed to pull it's oars in the same direction as the rest of the crew.

I don't know how often he and Cheney clashed, but given the wayward nature of the State Department, it wouldn't surprise me if they did.

He was kind of pissed that W (or whoever was running things, Cheney I guess) ran him out to the UN or wherever with bogus stories of WMDs in Iraq.

patteeu
06-06-2012, 10:49 PM
He was kind of pissed that W (or whoever was running things, Cheney I guess) ran him out to the UN or wherever with bogus stories of WMDs in Iraq.

No he wasn't. No one forced him to give that presentation. He believed what he was saying just like everyone else did.

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 11:14 PM
No he wasn't. No one forced him to give that presentation. He believed what he was saying just like everyone else did.

He believed it because he was told it was true. He wasn't/isn't pissed? That intelligence known to be questionable at best was included for him to present? Stuff from the discredited "Curveball" and stuff about yellowcake that was based on forged documents? I recall him saying it was a painful stain on his record. You have a very selective memory.

Easy 6
06-06-2012, 11:16 PM
It has to do with the fact that he either didn't do a very good job running the State Department or he was disloyal to his boss, the President. If he had major policy differences with Bush, he should have resigned. Instead, his organization leaked like a sieve against his own administration and often failed to pull it's oars in the same direction as the rest of the crew.

I don't know how often he and Cheney clashed, but given the wayward nature of the State Department, it wouldn't surprise me if they did.

Disloyal to his boss? Powell was a good soldier all along, brought in for his name & prestige yet slowly sidelined by Cheney & his crew, to the point that Powell knew his influence was shot, that they simply were not listening to him at all... yet well beyond that point he, atleast somewhat knowingly, allowed them to use & abuse his worldwide prestige before the UN on iraq.

Is that not loyalty?

patteeu
06-06-2012, 11:18 PM
He believed it because he was told it was true. He wasn't/isn't pissed? That intelligence known to be questionable at best was included for him to present? Stuff from the discredited "Curveball" and stuff about yellowcake that was based on forged documents? I recall him saying it was a painful stain on his record. You have a very selective memory.

He didn't get the intel "from W (or whoever was running things, Cheney [ you ] guess)". He got it from the same people those people got it from.

patteeu
06-06-2012, 11:19 PM
Disloyal to his boss? Powell was a good soldier all along, brought in for his name & prestige yet slowly sidelined by Cheney & his crew, to the point that Powell knew his influence was shot, that they simply were not listening to him at all... yet well beyond that point he, atleast somewhat knowingly, allowed them to use & abuse his worldwide prestige before the UN on iraq.

Is that not loyalty?

Leaking against his President's policies is disloyal. Failing to control his organization as it leaks against his President's policies is ineffective. Take your pick, I don't know which one it was. I'd like to think it was the latter, but really neither are very flattering.

AustinChief
06-06-2012, 11:28 PM
Richard Nixon and Herbert Hoover

Good to see someone else who appreciates Hoover. My 20th century favs at President are Truman and Hoover.

A very solid argument could be made that he was the smartest man to ever hold the office.

alnorth
06-06-2012, 11:35 PM
Barry Goldwater.

"Mr. Conservative" would have been primaried and run out of the party today, though. Socially, he was pretty moderate. His only home today would probably be the Libertarian Party.

cosmo20002
06-06-2012, 11:37 PM
Good to see someone else who appreciates Hoover. My 20th century favs at President are Truman and Hoover.

A very solid argument could be made that he was the smartest man to ever hold the office.

The thread (kind of awkwardly) asked for icons. Hoover would qualify. He was definitely one of the symbols of the Depression.

AustinChief
06-06-2012, 11:50 PM
The thread (kind of awkwardly) asked for icons. Hoover would qualify. He was definitely one of the symbols of the Depression.

I know, I wasn't really answering the thread.. just responding to Hoover.

Direckshun
06-07-2012, 10:47 AM
These days it's Elizabeth Warren, if by "icon" we mean "who do I really like."

Rain Man
06-07-2012, 10:53 AM
Good to see someone else who appreciates Hoover. My 20th century favs at President are Truman and Hoover.

A very solid argument could be made that he was the smartest man to ever hold the office.


What did Hoover do?

I remember that he was an engineer or some such thing, and he rode the slide down the Depression, but that's about all I know about him.

Chiefshrink
06-07-2012, 11:05 AM
I would love to have a sit down with Scott Walker who has just faced and been in "the belly of the beast" and not only come out the 'victor' but shows how to be a true leader "who speaks softly and carries a big MOFO stick"(although I can't stand TR but love his quote). Hopefully the rest of the GOP takes note and how not to fear and lead and expose these cowards for who they are
__________________

patteeu
06-07-2012, 11:18 AM
These days it's Elizabeth Warren, if by "icon" we mean "who do I really like."

Big fan of Native American politicians, huh?

Chiefshrink
06-07-2012, 11:28 AM
Big fan of Native American politicians, huh?

:clap: Lunacy to the max for sure.

He really needs to stick to just analyzing college football players potential for the NFL. That's his real gift but he won't put his 'real passion' on the line like I have:rolleyes:

BucEyedPea
06-07-2012, 12:14 PM
What did Hoover do?

I remember that he was an engineer or some such thing, and he rode the slide down the Depression, but that's about all I know about him.

He was an economic interventionist and progressive. He had his own mini New Deal despite his characterization as being laissez-faire—which he decidedly was not. He made things worse. You could compare him to Bush II prior to Obama just as Hoover was prior to FDR.


Just the facts.

listopencil
06-07-2012, 12:28 PM
Has to be a combination of Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson.

whoman69
06-07-2012, 04:14 PM
Richard Nixon and Herbert Hoover

Herbert is a distant cousin of mine.

whoman69
06-07-2012, 04:17 PM
Every post in this thread that doesn't identify Dick Cheney as the icon of icons is a failure.

Why does this not surprise me