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View Full Version : Food and Drink So..... Indian food.


Fire Me Boy!
06-15-2012, 09:34 PM
I rarely eat it, though I dig it. I've never tried cooking it. So looking to the board the vast expertise available.

What say you about Indian (forehead dot, not feathers) food?

mikeyis4dcats.
06-15-2012, 09:43 PM
love it, don't get it often enough.

Renegade
06-15-2012, 09:45 PM
There is a great Indian restaurant just outside St. Louis Airport (in a hotel, but can't remember which one). Pretty decent food, even for goat. I would eat Indian food again based on my experience.

Flachief58
06-15-2012, 09:47 PM
I absolutly love it

Saulbadguy
06-15-2012, 09:56 PM
Fresh spices. Lots of them. Try cooking vegetarian at first.

Canofbier
06-15-2012, 09:59 PM
There is a great Indian restaurant just outside St. Louis Airport (in a hotel, but can't remember which one). Pretty decent food, even for goat. I would eat Indian food again based on my experience.

India Palace. That place is amazing. If you've never gone there for the lunch buffet, do - it's as good as the food made to order, and they rotate most of the things each day. Yum.

Chief Roundup
06-15-2012, 10:03 PM
I have always heard it is fairly spicy?????

Pitt Gorilla
06-15-2012, 10:04 PM
LOVE Indian food. Navratan Korma, Chicken Tiki Masala, Palak Paneer.

Renegade
06-15-2012, 10:09 PM
India Palace. That place is amazing. If you've never gone there for the lunch buffet, do - it's as good as the food made to order, and they rotate most of the things each day. Yum.

That is the one. I may have to make a trip up there again. Which hotel is it in?

Canofbier
06-15-2012, 10:13 PM
That is the one. I may have to make a trip up there again. Which hotel is it in?

I don't remember what the hotel is called (and they don't say on the website), but the address is 4535 N Lindbergh Blvd, in Bridgeton. If you're in St. Louis and like Indian food, you owe it to yourself to try this place out.

mikeyis4dcats.
06-15-2012, 10:20 PM
according to google, that's a Howard Johnson's.

Fish
06-15-2012, 10:42 PM
Love to eat it. Hard to cook it though, I've tried a few times and completely failed.

Gives me indigestion like a mofo though...

I visit Taj Palace and Taj Mahal pretty regularly here.

KCUnited
06-15-2012, 11:02 PM
Love to eat it. Hard to cook it though, I've tried a few times and completely failed.


Likewise. Fortunately, I have a Pakistani/Indian place within walking distance. Samosas with beef khara masala is my favorite. It's really the only time I enjoy vegetarian dishes as well.

RJ
06-15-2012, 11:08 PM
About the best I can do is the yougurt/cucumber/cilantro sauce. I make that fairly often. And I can make a half-assed tandoori chicken on the Weber.

Fish
06-15-2012, 11:12 PM
Taj Mahal makes a spicy goat curry that I'm quite fond of...

Can't say I ever imagined liking goat meat. But I found it on the buffet, and it was awesome...

Phobia
06-15-2012, 11:43 PM
Love love. My mom works with a real Indian who caters for fun. Amazing food. Could eat every day.

listopencil
06-16-2012, 12:02 AM
Find a good recipe book that has lots of simple dishes. Start with curried chicken maybe. I know I just met you, and this is crazy, but buy some curry, and put it on chicken baby.

Chiefs=Good
06-16-2012, 12:34 AM
Much more common here i suppose. Eat and cook it a lot.

MagicHef
06-16-2012, 12:40 AM
Much more common here i suppose. Eat and cook it a lot.

I remember kangaroo curry being pretty good.

jspchief
06-16-2012, 12:42 AM
Tried it once as a teenager. Ordered a number of dishes to try and find.something I liked, and it was all aweful.

I probably owe it a second chance, but I don't like Indian people so probably won't.

Chiefs=Good
06-16-2012, 12:44 AM
I remember kangaroo curry being pretty good.

Cant say ive had it curried. But kangaroo is amazing.

kcfanintitanhell
06-16-2012, 12:59 AM
It all depends on the provinces that the restaurant specializes in...I hated the ones that specialized in the southern India cuisine...curry/coconut flavored.
However, the first time I had northern India cuisine (Punjabi) I was hooked...I could live on it..completely different.

Cornstock
06-16-2012, 01:11 AM
Where I've been in the Middle East has a strong Indian influence in the food. Not sure if its full Indian or an Arabian/Indian mix, but dejaj (chicken) biriyani is the greatest thing that side of the Nile. Also, mushroom masala was good. People have told me that curry is an acquired taste but I liked it from day 1. Its spicy, but its a pretty unique type of spicy. I'd encourage you to try it, but make sure you try a reputable place, because bad curry is baaaad.

cdcox
06-16-2012, 01:11 AM
Biryani. mmmmmmm.

Cornstock
06-16-2012, 01:29 AM
Biryani. mmmmmmm.

There's a place in my neighborhood where I can get a trashcan lid of chicken biriyani and rice along with a Barbican and 4 samosa for 800 baisa. Thats $2.08 USD

Ecto-I
06-16-2012, 03:07 AM
I actually AM Indian. Grew up with this stuff on a semi-daily basis. So yes, I obviously love it....however as far as cooking is concerned, well my skills are limited.

bevischief
06-16-2012, 06:41 AM
I have tried it and don't like it. It was a buffet.

wilas101
06-16-2012, 08:02 AM
This is a hit in my house. Even the kids eat it.

it's not necessarily "authentic" in the sense that it uses beef but I don't really care because it's good.

You'll have to do some math. Silly Brits and the metric system.

http://www.channel4.com/4food/recipes/popular-cuisines/indian/coconut-beef-madras-recipe

mikeyis4dcats.
06-16-2012, 08:40 AM
This is a hit in my house. Even the kids eat it.

it's not necessarily "authentic" in the sense that it uses beef but I don't really care because it's good.

You'll have to do some math. Silly Brits and the metric system.

http://www.channel4.com/4food/recipes/popular-cuisines/indian/coconut-beef-madras-recipe

plenty of Indian food uses beef - they aren't all Hindu

Fritz88
06-16-2012, 08:48 AM
That is the one. I may have to make a trip up there again. Which hotel is it in?

There is one on Lawrence.
Posted via Mobile Device

Fritz88
06-16-2012, 08:50 AM
BTW what you have in the States and UK is the westernized version of desi food, much like Olive Garden to actual Italian food, the only difference is that the American version of the Indian food is pretty good.
Posted via Mobile Device

buddha
06-16-2012, 08:51 AM
I could eat Indian food every day. It's delicious.

Some of it is spicy, but most of it isn't. I ask for them to make it hotter.

Order off the menu and don't do the buffets. Best suggestion I can give you.

The God Hypothesis
06-16-2012, 08:53 AM
For the KC North crew, try Swagat up in Zona, they have an every day lunch buffet that has a great variety and a ton of flavor. You won't be disappointed in the quality either.

scho63
06-16-2012, 08:58 AM
I just ate at an Indian Buffet yesterday for lunch. Very large Indian population in the Washington DC area so plenty of good places.

Had Curried Goat, Tikka Masala (butter chicken), Matter Paneer (cottage cheese cubes with peas in a creamy tomato sauce, Spinach and Corn Palak (Creamed spinach with corn), Idly and Naan Bread, galub jamun (warm honey soaked donut holes), some Chaats (appetizers), Lemon Rice, Tandori Chicken, Potato Vindaloo (very spicy HOT), and Veggie Pakora (Fried vegtables in a chick pea flour), and a large Kingfisher Beer


It was delicious!!!!

-King-
06-16-2012, 09:40 AM
I just ate at an Indian Buffet yesterday for lunch. Very large Indian population in the Washington DC area so plenty of good places.

Had Curried Goat, Tikka Masala (butter chicken), Matter Paneer (cottage cheese cubes with peas in a creamy tomato sauce, Spinach and Corn Palak (Creamed spinach with corn), Idly and Naan Bread, galub jamun (warm honey soaked donut holes), some Chaats (appetizers), Lemon Rice, Tandori Chicken, Potato Vindaloo (very spicy HOT), and Veggie Pakora (Fried vegtables in a chick pea flour), and a large Kingfisher Beer


It was delicious!!!!

You sure that was enough food?
Posted via Mobile Device

aturnis
06-16-2012, 11:33 AM
curry is gross...

Fire Me Boy!
06-16-2012, 11:39 AM
I'm thinking of making some chicken tikka masala tomorrow... never tried to make curry.

Predarat
06-16-2012, 11:45 AM
I like it, nice and spicy yet tasty with substance.

Frazod
06-16-2012, 11:58 AM
I love Indian food. I have a pretty good recipe for making tandoori chicken on the grill, too.

Rausch
06-16-2012, 12:31 PM
We only have one place here and it was fucking horrible.

Saulbadguy
06-16-2012, 03:10 PM
I love Indian food. I have a pretty good recipe for making tandoori chicken on the grill, too.

Post it, please.

mikeyis4dcats.
06-16-2012, 05:16 PM
my wife has a good butter chicken recipe....I'll find out what site she got it from.

Fire Me Boy!
06-16-2012, 05:42 PM
I love Indian food. I have a pretty good recipe for making tandoori chicken on the grill, too.

Generally, when you say you have a good recipe or something, you post that recipe.

:harumph:

Paniero
06-16-2012, 07:11 PM
I spend some time in India, and find the food unbearable. My least favorite cuisine.

scho63
06-16-2012, 07:45 PM
You sure that was enough food?
Posted via Mobile Device

ROFL

Small scoops of each to taste....

BigOlChiefsfan
06-16-2012, 08:46 PM
Re: Indian food - this is my take on Dahl, which may be any sort of peas/pulse spiced up. I make this a couple of times per month. It's cheap, tasty, filling, and good for the stuff that's wrong with me.
I pick over a lb of split peas, put them in a big crock pot with a 48 oz package of chicken broth and a can of ro-tel, let them cook for 6 - 8 hours on low. Next, dice a couple of small onions and 4 cloves of garlic. Heat 3 Tblspns of olive oil in a med. skillet, add your onions and stir for 5 minutes or so. Add your garlic, add 1 Tblspn of cumin seed, 1 of mustard seeds, some thyme and crushed red pepper. Then add a spoon or 2 of curry powder. Stir well. Let the curry cook onto the onions while the seeds 'frizzle' in the hot oil for 3 or 4 minutes, then pour the whole pot of veggies and spiced oil into your peas. Stir again. (This is called 'tempering' your dahl, adding spice at the last minute to get the full flavor). I usually add a well rinsed can of kidney beans or a can of chick peas at this stage. Stir in a drizzle of sesame oil, taste and correct any seasoning as needed.

I serve this as is, or with basmatti rice, with a dollop of plain yogurt - I sometimes doctor up the yogurt w/a clove of minced garlic and sometimes a hunk of cucumber, diced fine, some mint (this is similar to a condiment called 'Raita').

It's not rocket science, and I'm not sure if split green peas are 'traditional' Indian food but I like their taste this way. You might like 'em too. If you cook other Indian peas, the same trick of spicing them w/hot oil, aromatics like onions and seeds just before serving is usually a good one.

Fire Me Boy!
06-16-2012, 09:17 PM
Re: Indian food - this is my take on Dahl, which may be any sort of peas/pulse spiced up. I make this a couple of times per month. It's cheap, tasty, filling, and good for the stuff that's wrong with me.
I pick over a lb of split peas, put them in a big crock pot with a 48 oz package of chicken broth and a can of ro-tel, let them cook for 6 - 8 hours on low. Next, dice a couple of small onions and 4 cloves of garlic. Heat 3 Tblspns of olive oil in a med. skillet, add your onions and stir for 5 minutes or so. Add your garlic, add 1 Tblspn of cumin seed, 1 of mustard seeds, some thyme and crushed red pepper. Then add a spoon or 2 of curry powder. Stir well. Let the curry cook onto the onions while the seeds 'frizzle' in the hot oil for 3 or 4 minutes, then pour the whole pot of veggies and spiced oil into your peas. Stir again. (This is called 'tempering' your dahl, adding spice at the last minute to get the full flavor). I usually add a well rinsed can of kidney beans or a can of chick peas at this stage. Stir in a drizzle of sesame oil, taste and correct any seasoning as needed.

I serve this as is, or with basmatti rice, with a dollop of plain yogurt - I sometimes doctor up the yogurt w/a clove of minced garlic and sometimes a hunk of cucumber, diced fine, some mint (this is similar to a condiment called 'Raita').

It's not rocket science, and I'm not sure if split green peas are 'traditional' Indian food but I like their taste this way. You might like 'em too. If you cook other Indian peas, the same trick of spicing them w/hot oil, aromatics like onions and seeds just before serving is usually a good one.

This sounds pretty good.

But the bolded part, what you've described is called "blooming" the spice.

listopencil
06-17-2012, 12:56 AM
curry is gross...

Have you tried curried chicken? Or a light dusting of curry on fried eggs along with onion powder, garlic powder, white pepper and sea salt?

listopencil
06-17-2012, 01:00 AM
This sounds pretty good.

But the bolded part, what you've described is called "blooming" the spice.

Huh...that's interesting. Here's an article about it:


Blooming is a technique where you take some spices and heat them up in oil to release and amplify the flavor of the spice.

(snip)

The first thing to note about spices is most of the flavor is carried by essential oils. Because the flavor compounds are tied to the oils, it means that they will not easily dissolve in water or water-based solutions. Although there are ways around this, dumping a bunch of spices into a stew and hoping everything distributes evenly and well is not a guaranteed method of success.

A difficulty with the flavors being tied to the essential oils is that things that break down oils will harm the spices. Air, heat, and, light are all enemies of the spice flavorings, so minimize exposure except in certain circumstances.

On the other hand, spices are still food, at least the way we use them, and being food it means that we can often change the flavor with cooking. Take cumin, for example: if you apply heat to cumin, then the cumin seeds brown, which changes the flavor on account of the maillard reactions. Golden brown and delicious applies to many spices just as much as it does to a piece of fried chicken.

For a great article about the Maillard rections, I recommend getting a copy of the February-March 2009 Issue of Fine Cooking and checking out The Food Geek column on page 22. However, for those who don't have that handy, the Maillard reactions are the complex browning reactions that happen to food at temperatures below that of caramelization. Sugar caramelizes at a temperature above the smoke point of most cooking oils, and most food burns if kept at that temperature for too long. Still, the food does turn brown, and it is tasty, and the culprits in these instances are the Maillard reactions.

What blooming does is take advantage of the oil nature of the spice and the potential for flavor-changing maillard reactions without destroying too much of the flavor. The idea is to put the spices into an oil, heat to somewhere just below the smoke point of the oil, and cook for just a little while. Spices will brown, and more importantly, the essential oils will emerge from the spices and infuse the rest of the oil.

You can filter the oil and use in what you're cooking that evening, or if you've made enough, you can store it for later. This is the general idea behind a chili oil (http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/12/chinese-cooking-from-cookbooks/): create a bunch of flavor that you can insert into your cooking later.

What can you do with this spicy oil? You can use it as a last-minute flavor addition, especially for long-cooking dishes such as a stew or anything in a slow-cooker. Any sauce that has an oil component could be modified with this oil. This goes from a reduction sauce or barbeque sauce to, say, mayonnaise. Naturally, this could make a lovely end-of-the-year gift for your friends and family. Let your imagination run wild, and have fun with your new technique.


http://www.finecooking.com/item/9788/bloomin-spices

lazepoo
06-17-2012, 02:35 AM
I rarely eat it, though I dig it. I've never tried cooking it. So looking to the board the vast expertise available.

What say you about Indian (forehead dot, not feathers) food?
Is there American Indian food around? I've never had it or seen a place advertise it.

Fritz88
06-17-2012, 02:54 AM
I spend some time in India, and find the food unbearable. My least favorite cuisine.

The actual authentic Indian cuisine will not be liked by many in the west.
Posted via Mobile Device

BigOlChiefsfan
06-17-2012, 06:20 AM
This turkish eggs and yogurt dish is better tasting than it may sound:

turkish poached eggs with yogurt (http://almostturkish.blogspot.com/2007/03/turkish-poached-eggs-with-yogurt-lbr.html)

DJ's left nut
06-17-2012, 12:02 PM
Ugh...I hate Indian food.

A friend of mine said it best: "Rich people in India aren't eating this shit"

The Indian food we tend to get here is the crap meat slathered in heavy sauces and seasoning because it's the only way they could make so few resources feed so many people in that country.

It's some of the worst stuff I've ever eaten.

But it does make me respect Mexico and China that much more - afterall, their crap food is still tasty as hell. Indian food just looks and smells like something my dog has yacked up.

BigOlChiefsfan
06-18-2012, 09:45 AM
spicy chickpeas (http://www.chickpearecipes.com/spicy-chickpeas.html)

http://www.chickpearecipes.com/

Count Alex's Losses
06-18-2012, 11:12 AM
Ugh...I hate Indian food.

A friend of mine said it best: "Rich people in India aren't eating this shit"

The Indian food we tend to get here is the crap meat slathered in heavy sauces and seasoning because it's the only way they could make so few resources feed so many people in that country.

It's some of the worst stuff I've ever eaten.

But it does make me respect Mexico and China that much more - afterall, their crap food is still tasty as hell. Indian food just looks and smells like something my dog has yacked up.

You're ignorant.

There are fine dining Indian restaurants all over America that serve amazing food.

scho63
06-19-2012, 06:21 PM
One more item: there are MANY different types of Indian food as they have many different flavors and dishes depending on what part of India. Very varied

UPDATE: Went to a great Indian Buffet about 50 miles away today when visiting a client. One of the best I've been to-second time here.

I ate some lambs

scho63
06-21-2012, 05:01 PM
UPDATE: Went to a great Indian Buffet about 50 miles away today when visiting a client. One of the best I've been to-second time here.

I ate some lambs

SEE PHOTOS ABOVE

boogblaster
06-21-2012, 07:29 PM
no .....

listopencil
06-21-2012, 11:20 PM
You're ignorant.

There are fine dining Indian restaurants all over America that serve amazing food.

Yup.

listopencil
06-21-2012, 11:22 PM
The actual authentic Indian cuisine will not be liked by many in the west.
Posted via Mobile Device


Meh. Authentic Mexican food isn't all that hot either. Most of what you eat here is going to be Tex Mex or Cal Mex.

kcfanintitanhell
06-22-2012, 01:16 AM
One more item: there are MANY different types of Indian food as they have many different flavors and dishes depending on what part of India. Very varied

UPDATE: Went to a great Indian Buffet about 50 miles away today when visiting a client. One of the best I've been to-second time here.

I ate some lambs

This looks a whole lot like the place I was referring to earlier, which is great...being that you're from VA, it could be the same place, but it's in East Tennessee.