PDA

View Full Version : Football Just In: ART MODELL dies at age 87


Johnny Vegas
09-06-2012, 05:14 AM
nothing for news as it just broke on NFL AM.

redgoldexpress
09-06-2012, 05:15 AM
according to what source

Johnny Vegas
09-06-2012, 05:16 AM
go on NFL network.

Guru
09-06-2012, 05:16 AM
RIP

redgoldexpress
09-06-2012, 05:17 AM
they just changed it then..lol

Chiefnj2
09-06-2012, 05:19 AM
He's not dead, he just moved in the middle of the night.

Guru
09-06-2012, 05:38 AM
OK. Don't RIP

big nasty kcnut
09-06-2012, 05:47 AM
He should rest in peace but i'll bet the Cleveland fans will find his grave and piss on it

Tribal Warfare
09-06-2012, 06:08 AM
Art Modell dies at 87 (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/art-modell-dies-age-87-former-owner-cleveland-browns-baltimore-ravens-moved-franchise-became-hero-villain-090612)
Former Baltimore Ravens owner Art Modell has died. He was 87.

The team said Modell died early Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he had been admitted Wednesday. A cause of death was not given.

Modell was among the most important figures in the NFL as owner of the Cleveland Browns, which became the Ravens after he took the team to Baltimore in 1996 in a move that tarnished his reputation as one of the league's most innovative and influential owners.

The Ravens won their lone Super Bowl in January 2001, less than a year after Modell sold a minority interest of the team to Steve Bisciotti. In April 2004. Bisciotti completed purchase of the franchise but left Modell a 1 percent share.

During his four decades as an NFL owner, Modell helped negotiate the league's lucrative contracts with television networks, served as president of the NFL from 1967 to 1969, and chaired the negotiations for the first the collective bargaining agreement with the players in 1968.

He also was the driving force behind the 1970 contract between the NFL and ABC to televise games on Monday night.

At one time one of Cleveland's biggest civic leaders, Modell became a pariah in Ohio after he moved the team.

''I have a great legacy, tarnished somewhat by the move,'' he said in 1999. ''The politicians and the bureaucrats saw fit to cover their own rear ends by blaming it on me.''

The move was also believed to be the main reason why Modell never made it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was one of 15 finalists in 2001 and a semifinalist seven times between 2004 and 2011.

''I believe Art belongs in the Hall of Fame,'' former New York Giants owner Wellington Mara, now deceased, said in 2002. ''I don't think I know a person who has done more for the league than Modell, especially through television.''

Modell's Browns were among the best teams of the 1960s, led during his first few years as owner by legendary running back Jim Brown. Cleveland won the NFL championship in 1964 - Modell's only title with the Browns - and played in the title game in 1965, 1968 and 1969.

Modell said he lost millions of dollars operating the Browns in Cleveland and cited the state of Maryland's financial package, including construction of a $200 million stadium, as his reasons for going to Baltimore. The Ravens replaced the Baltimore Colts, who moved to Indianapolis in 1984.

''This has been a very, very tough road for my family and me,'' Modell said at the time of the move. ''I leave my heart and part of my soul in Cleveland. But frankly, it came down to a simple proposition: I had no choice.''

Ironically, the cost of the move to Baltimore left him financially strapped and left him no choice but to put in motion the chain of events that enabled Bisciotti to assume majority ownership of the franchise.

Bisciotti has since poured millions into the team, financing construction of a lavish practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. As a tribute to Modell, Bisciotti insisted that a huge oil painting of Modell be hung above the fireplace at the entrance to the complex.

Born June 23, 1925, in Brooklyn, N.Y., Modell dropped out of high school at age 15 and worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard cleaning out the hulls of ships to help out his financially strapped family after the death of his father.

He completed high school in night class, joined the Air Force in 1943, and then enrolled in a television school after World War II. He used that education to produce one of the first regular daytime television programs before moving into the advertising business in 1954.

A group of friends led by Modell purchased the Browns in 1961 for $4 million - a figure he called ''totally excessive.''

''You get few chances like this,'' he said at the time. ''To take advantage of the opportunity, you must have money and friends with more.''

BoneKrusher
09-06-2012, 06:09 AM
RIP

Deberg_1990
09-06-2012, 06:14 AM
He should rest in peace but i'll bet the Cleveland fans will find his grave and piss on it


and rightly should. How would Chiefs fans feel if Hunt moved the team and won a Super Bowl 5 years later?

Guru
09-06-2012, 06:16 AM
RIP again

BigMeatballDave
09-06-2012, 06:42 AM
Party time in Cleveland!

bevischief
09-06-2012, 06:52 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/nfl/09/06/art-modell-dies.ap/index.html?sct=nfl_t2_a3

Art Modell dead at 87

Story Highlights
Modell died Thursday of natural causes at Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Hospital
An innovator, his moving the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore was controversial
Modell served as NFL president and was a force behind its lucrative TV contracts

Art Modell, former owner of the Baltimore Ravens and Cleveland Browns is dead at 87.
Art Modell's former Cleveland Browns won the Super Bowl in 2001 as the Baltimore Ravens by beating the New York Giants.
Laura Rauch/AP


BALTIMORE (AP) -- Former Baltimore Ravens owner Art Modell has died. He was 87.

The team said Modell died of natural causes early Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he had been admitted Wednesday.

Modell was among the most important figures in the NFL as owner of the Cleveland Browns, which became the Ravens after he took the team to Baltimore in 1996 in a move that tarnished his reputation as one of the league's most innovative and influential owners.

The Ravens won their lone Super Bowl in January 2001, less than a year after Modell sold a minority interest of the team to Steve Bisciotti. In April 2004. Bisciotti completed purchase of the franchise but left Modell a 1 percent share.

During his four decades as an NFL owner, Modell helped negotiate the league's lucrative contracts with television networks, served as president of the NFL from 1967 to 1969, and chaired the negotiations for the first the collective bargaining agreement with the players in 1968.

He also was the driving force behind the 1970 contract between the NFL and ABC to televise games on Monday night.

At one time one of Cleveland's biggest civic leaders, Modell became a pariah in Ohio after he moved the team.

"I have a great legacy, tarnished somewhat by the move," he said in 1999. "The politicians and the bureaucrats saw fit to cover their own rear ends by blaming it on me."

The move was also believed to be the main reason why Modell never made it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was one of 15 finalists in 2001 and a semifinalist seven times between 2004 and 2011.

"I believe Art belongs in the Hall of Fame," former New York Giants owner Wellington Mara, now deceased, said in 2002. "I don't think I know a person who has done more for the league than Modell, especially through television."

Modell's Browns were among the best teams of the 1960s, led during his first few years as owner by legendary running back Jim Brown. Cleveland won the NFL championship in 1964 - Modell's only title with the Browns - and played in the title game in 1965, 1968 and 1969.

Modell said he lost millions of dollars operating the Browns in Cleveland and cited the state of Maryland's financial package, including construction of a $200 million stadium, as his reasons for going to Baltimore. The Ravens replaced the Baltimore Colts, who moved to Indianapolis in 1984.

"This has been a very, very tough road for my family and me," Modell said at the time of the move. "I leave my heart and part of my soul in Cleveland. But frankly, it came down to a simple proposition: I had no choice."

Ironically, the cost of the move to Baltimore left him financially strapped and left him no choice but to put in motion the chain of events that enabled Bisciotti to assume majority ownership of the franchise.

Bisciotti has since poured millions into the team, financing construction of a lavish practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. As a tribute to Modell, Bisciotti insisted that a huge oil painting of Modell be hung above the fireplace at the entrance to the complex.

Born June 23, 1925, in Brooklyn, N.Y., Modell dropped out of high school at age 15 and worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard cleaning out the hulls of ships to help out his financially strapped family after the death of his father.

He completed high school in night class, joined the Air Force in 1943, and then enrolled in a television school after World War II. He used that education to produce one of the first regular daytime television programs before moving into the advertising business in 1954.

A group of friends led by Modell purchased the Browns in 1961 for $4 million - a figure he called "totally excessive."

"You get few chances like this," he said at the time. "To take advantage of the opportunity, you must have money and friends with more."

Aside from his work with the Browns, Modell became a leader in the Cleveland community. He served on the board of directors of a number of large companies, including the Ohio Bell Telephone Co., the Higbee Co. and the 20th Century-Fox Film Corp.

Modell and his wife, Patricia, continued their charitable ways in Baltimore, donating millions of dollars to The Seed School of Maryland, a boarding school in Maryland for disadvantaged youths; Johns Hopkins Hospital; and the Kennedy Krieger Institute. The couple also gave $3.5 million to the Lyric, which was renamed the Patricia & Art Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric.

Patricia, his wife of 42 years, passed away in 2011.

Modell was beloved in Baltimore, and hoped one day the people of Cleveland would remember him for what he accomplished in the city. Long after the move, Modell pointed out that Cleveland ultimately got the new stadium he coveted, and that the expansion version of the Browns could draw on the history he helped crate.

"I think that part of my legacy is I left the colors, the name and the records in Cleveland," Modell said. "The fans in Cleveland were loyal and supportive. They lived and died with me every Sunday for 35 years."

Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/nfl/09/06/art-modell-dies.ap/index.html#ixzz25h4FJ18N

htismaqe
09-06-2012, 06:57 AM
and rightly should. How would Chiefs fans feel if Hunt moved the team and won a Super Bowl 5 years later?

It depends on the circumstances behind the move.

There's 2 parties involved in any municipal stadium deal and one of them is ALWAYS the government.

chiefzilla1501
09-06-2012, 07:26 AM
I'm not a man to piss on anyone's grave. RIP, but being close to many a Cleveland fan, they have a right to not have liked the man.

Amnorix
09-06-2012, 07:29 AM
I'm reposting here from the other thread.

I'm sure he wasn't a bad guy and all, and he did alot of great things for the league, but it's not everybody who could fire both Paul Brown and Bill Belichick (who I think inarguably constitute 2 of the top 5 NFL coaches all-time) and announce that he will be moving a team out of its home city during the middle of the season.

tooge
09-06-2012, 09:07 AM
I love the Browns fans signs "Muck Fodell" after he moved the team

Deberg_1990
09-06-2012, 09:17 AM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LH9gC0APaFU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Rain Man
09-06-2012, 09:44 AM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LH9gC0APaFU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


That looks like any home game in Oakland.

buddha
09-06-2012, 10:22 AM
That looks like any home game in Oakland.

This...well said RM.

The one good thing I can say for Modell is this...he let Cleveland keep the Browns name. The same can't be said for f'ing Irsay and many other owners. The least an owner can do is leave the team name behind for future expansion and Art did this.

Rausch
09-06-2012, 10:26 AM
Fuck him.

Have fun fending off the angry flaming hep-0-rhea-aids pandas in heat....

Canofbier
09-06-2012, 11:26 AM
Too bad; I hear he was a modell citizen.

Reerun_KC
09-06-2012, 11:27 AM
http://gifsoup.com/webroot/animatedgifs/530495_o.gif

Count Zarth
09-06-2012, 11:33 AM
One of the few assholes in this world that is worse than Cassel.

Frazod
09-06-2012, 11:38 AM
At least he was self made. Also a WWII vet. He may have become a giant douche later in life, but at least he wasn't born with a silver spoon in his mouth.

Brock
09-06-2012, 11:48 AM
and rightly should. How would Chiefs fans feel if Hunt moved the team and won a Super Bowl 5 years later?

If KC made the Chiefs play in a crapcan stadium the way Cleveland did the Browns for decades, I wouldn't blame him.

Deberg_1990
09-06-2012, 12:03 PM
If KC made the Chiefs play in a crapcan stadium the way Cleveland did the Browns for decades, I wouldn't blame him.

and then they built a brand new one just a few years after he moved.

Dartgod
09-06-2012, 12:09 PM
Like a factory of sadness...

Brock
09-06-2012, 12:20 PM
and then they built a brand new one just a few years after he moved.

Well, that was helpful.

Reerun_KC
09-06-2012, 12:29 PM
One of the few assholes in this world that is worse than Cassel.

http://cdn.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/parksandrecreation-season-4-gag-reel-6.gif

lcarus
09-06-2012, 12:35 PM
BURN IN HELL YOU SON OF A BITCH.





Kidding.

whoman69
09-06-2012, 01:14 PM
Cleveland should get over it. They had a crumbling wreck of a stadium when he left. Baltimore did too, but at least they worked with him to get a new one. Guy did a lot for Cleveland that was forgotten the second he took the Browns out of town.

htismaqe
09-06-2012, 01:16 PM
Cleveland should get over it. They had a crumbling wreck of a stadium when he left. Baltimore did too, but at least they worked with him to get a new one. Guy did a lot for Cleveland that was forgotten the second he took the Browns out of town.

Guy did a lot for football period.

It's amazing that the only thing he's remember for is the move to Baltimore.

He was instrumental in the 60's in turning the NFL into a TV juggernaut.

chefsos
09-06-2012, 02:39 PM
The whole Cleveland sports thing revolves around being perpetual victims, and they play the part well. So, frankly, fuck 'em. You can probably count the giants of this league on one hand, and Modell would be one of the fingers. Which finger he is depends on who you're asking.

gblowfish
09-07-2012, 01:22 PM
I doubt this goes well:
http://sports.yahoo.com/news/browns-recognize-owner-modell-opener-174423424--nfl.html