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View Full Version : U.S. Issues Three million open jobs in U.S., but who's qualified?


BigRedChief
11-11-2012, 11:24 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18560_162-57547342/three-million-open-jobs-in-u.s-but-whos-qualified/

The video of the 60 minutes piece.
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50134943n

The balance of power in Washington didn't change this week as President Obama and most members of Congress kept their jobs. They'll go back to work and face an unemployment problem that also hasn't changed very much.



Every month since January 2009, more than 20 million Americans have been either out of work or underemployed. Yet despite that staggering number, there are more than three million job openings in the U.S. Just in manufacturing, there are as many as 500,000 jobs that aren't being filled because employers say they can't find qualified workers.



It's called "the skills gap." How could that be, we wondered, at a time like this with so many people out of work? No place is the question more pressing than in Nevada. The state with the highest unemployment rate in the country. A place where there are jobs waiting to be filled.



Karl Hutter: Yeah, we hear way too much about the United States manufacturing, we don't manufacture anything anymore. Not true. Not true.
Byron Pitts: Sure, it's Mexico, it's in China--
Karl Hutter: Yeah, yeah, that all went to China, that all went to Mexico. Not true, whatsoever.
Karl Hutter is the new chief operating officer of Click Bond in Carson City, Nev., a company his parents started in 1969.
Karl Hutter: We're still technically a small business, but we're growing quickly.
Byron Pitts: So, you're hiring?
Karl Hutter: We are hiring. We're hiring and we need to find good people. And that's really what the challenge is these days.

Brock
11-11-2012, 11:42 PM
Just from what I've observed lately, you need to be in your twenties and willing to work for mediocre to low pay. Hence the lack of qualifications.

BigRedChief
11-11-2012, 11:48 PM
Just from what I've observed lately, you need to be in your twenties and willing to work for mediocre to low pay. Hence the lack of qualifications.

Yep in the piece, the guys in the factory trained for a year. Worked for free. At the end of the year, they got a full time job at $12 an hour.

BucEyedPea
11-11-2012, 11:59 PM
I remember in the 1990s when employment was high it was hard to get skilled or responsible workers. One business owner told me he was just going to take in less work because he couldn't get what he needed.

Pawnmower
11-12-2012, 12:18 AM
awesome i want to train for a year at zero pay then get 12 bucks an hour

LOL

jiveturkey
11-12-2012, 08:29 AM
I'm a corporate recruiter in healthcare and we consistently have a shit pile of high-end RN openings across the nation with approximately 30% of those jobs being open for more than 90 days.

It's been like this for the 4 years that I've been here though. There's just a lack of nurses that have the skills to move up.

HonestChieffan
11-12-2012, 08:31 AM
You would be amazed how many fail the drug screen

Direckshun
11-12-2012, 09:11 AM
Beveridge curve (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=262749). It's real.

1/3rd of unemployment is due to mismatches in employment and the unemployed.

Soon as that rectifies itself (I'd say around 2014...), unemployment drops like a rock.

Trivers
11-12-2012, 09:26 AM
28 IT and marketing openings paying $14/hr to $30/hr. We get 100+ resumes per week.

3 senior management openings paying $25/hr to $40/hr. Can't find qualified talent willing to move to WI.

Trivers
11-12-2012, 09:28 AM
From WI manufacturing perspective:

According to my buddies....

THey can't find enough people to work CNC machines. Alot of candidates don't want to train, fail drug tests, or think the wages are too low to be worth their time. $15/hr is considered very good money in rural WI.

BigRedChief
11-12-2012, 09:32 AM
I'm a corporate recruiter in healthcare and we consistently have a shit pile of high-end RN openings across the nation with approximately 30% of those jobs being open for more than 90 days.

It's been like this for the 4 years that I've been here though. There's just a lack of nurses that have the skills to move up.I'm sure I know the reason for those opening.

I worked as a Respiratory Therapist for 9 years. Mostly ICU and a level 1 trauma ER. By the time you get to that level where you can deal with those high end life and death issues, the clock has been ticking. You have to care to do the job, but you have to leave work at work. After a while you start to bring work home with you. At that point you are through in that part of the health care field. You just want to go work at some Dr. Office 9-5 M-F.

Those high end RN's take some time to get there and then they burn out. Not a long life span at the top end. A lot of turnover.

MagicHef
11-12-2012, 09:45 AM
I was unemployed/underemployed for about 21 out of the last 33 months in Colorado. I would apply to a job and hear back that these companies were receiving 500-1000 applications per position.

I decided to look elsewhere and got a job pretty much immediately in Houston. I got a call for an interview literally 20 minutes after submitting my resume online to one job.There are a lot of openings in my field (engineering) down here, and it feels pretty good knowing that if anything were to happen to the company I work for, a new job would be relatively easy to find.

BucEyedPea
11-12-2012, 09:47 AM
You would be amazed how many fail the drug screen

You'd be amazed at what poor attitudes some of the young workers have. Sense of entitlement, not showing up. You know those millennials. Anecdotal from my own experience in hiring but also per two HR people I know.

BucEyedPea
11-12-2012, 09:49 AM
I was unemployed/underemployed for about 21 out of the last 33 months in Colorado. I would apply to a job and hear back that these companies were receiving 500-1000 applications per position.

I decided to look elsewhere and got a job pretty much immediately in Houston. I got a call for an interview literally 20 minutes after submitting my resume online to one job.There are a lot of openings in my field (engineering) down here, and it feels pretty good knowing that if anything were to happen to the company I work for, a new job would be relatively easy to find.

It works better to work through people you know if you can. That's how I found my two part-time jobs during this recession quickly. I've a great part-time gig while I update my skills now with courses. Other places were inundated with applications. But that's usually true. When I've advertised for help, I'd get a lot. I wouldn't even open all of them. Probably were more during this period.

Trivers
11-12-2012, 09:54 AM
I still see a lot of entitlement where people are not willing to change or adapt to the new work environment where you have to justify why you should be hired, make the same or even money that before, and learn new skills via self training.

The job market competition is fierce.

But being a business owner also sucks as increased global competition, lack of market opportunity, and decreased access to capital. Due to a acquisition that went south, I am paying myself less than anyone else in the company.

underEJ
11-12-2012, 11:44 AM
My industry is interesting. There is a constant fear of losing high paying jobs to other countries with film tax incentives like Canada and New Zealand, but people have adapted to it, and the same industry veterans are being lured to those jobs. I have worked in New Zealand, and actually got paid more than in the US all tolled. It is scary to look for work when you know your best deal is going to be out of the country, but for the most part it is in nice places, London, Sydney, Wellington, Vancouver. Also, Shanghai is on the rise, and is a very cosmopolitan city. I've been entrenched in a Los Angeles job now for ten years with a four year contract looking forward, but I feel pretty good about the world job outlook if I need to move on in 4 years.

There are also schools finally doing a good job of turning out ready entry level candidates 20 years in. My young team members are often shocked to hear that I have no degree while they are often looking at postings with multiple degree requirements. I try to explain that there was no equivalent when I was in school. There was film and there was computer science and they didn't really cross except for a few programs like Ohio State and Texas A&M.

I think many industries are in a similar situation where they are waiting for the candidates to come fully prepared out of college again. We actually work with schools to give feedback on their candidates and programs. Some are completely uninterested in the feedback, which is pretty surprising considering they should want to have companies primed to look at their grads. There are a couple of schools that have really merged our feedback into their programs and it shows in the percentage of new hires that come directly from those programs. I hired 5 college grads this year, 4 were from one program, and all have exceeded expectations. That would not have happened even 5 years ago.

Change is good sometimes.

Xanathol
11-12-2012, 11:52 AM
At my company, job openings are always posted, even though there is absolutely no intent to hire ( we're actually cutting back via attrition right now ). Its basically a marketing ploy to the stockholders.