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View Full Version : Legal Elderly couple removed from longtime home


3rd&48ers
11-20-2012, 05:50 AM
Big Gubment at it's Finest... I will never live this long but to those of you blesses with longevity genes ... Keep voting for this shit..



In May 1964, Nels and Irene Highberg bought their first and only home. It was a modest, brick rancher -- no garage -- on a pleasant cul-de-sac on the edge of East Petersburg.
The Highbergs raised two sons there. They entertained neighbors there. They grew old there.
After 48 years at 6312 Miriam Circle, the Highbergs -- Nels is 92, Irene is 89 -- figured they could manage a while longer. Family and friends agreed.
But the county Office of Aging stepped in last summer, saying for safety reasons the Highbergs must move to a nursing home.
"I ain't going to go," Highberg said, according to Erick Highberg, the couple's 54-year-old son.
When a van arrived Aug. 2 to take the couple to Oak Leaf Manor in Millersville, Highberg sat in a chair in the driveway for many long minutes. He got in the van only after a police officer showed up.
"He respected her uniform," said Erick Highberg, noting his father's more than 20 years of service in the Navy and Coast Guard.
Mrs. Highberg said in a phone interview she got in the van to see what the nursing home was like. "I didn't understand we would be locked up here," she said. "They brought us in here, and they kind of disappeared real quick."
Now, after more than three months at Oak Leaf Manor, Mrs. Highberg still wants to return home.
"If I have to be here, it couldn't be better," she said. "It's a very nice place. The rooms are nice and clean, and the food is good, and they have entertainment, and we get out to do some things, musicals and such once in a while. Really, you wonder what the heck I'm complaining about. Well, it's not my house."
What prompted the Office of Aging's action was receipt June 10 of a "report of need" from a party the agency, by law, may not disclose.
The party, according to a court document, said Mrs. Highberg was confused and unable to care for herself, yet she was caring for "her incapacitated husband when she was in all likelihood more confused than he."
The Office of Aging then conducted an investigation that included a medical exam at the Highbergs' home by Dr. Robert M. Howse Jr., a geriatrics specialist. The doctor recommended placement in a dementia unit and appointment of a guardian to oversee the couple's affairs. He wrote that the Highbergs had lost the capacity for sound decision-making as long ago as January 2007.


Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/780904_Elderly-couple-removed--from-longtime-home--family--friend-dispute-Office-of-Aging-findings.html#ixzz2Clb3xvOj

mikey23545
11-20-2012, 06:24 AM
"What prompted the Office of Aging's action was receipt June 10 of a "report of need" from a party the agency, by law, may not disclose."


I assume this "Office of Aging" will be working hand-in-hand with the Death Panel...

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 06:44 AM
I find it absolutely despicable that you would attempt to use this as some sort of political thing. This was obviously a case where they couldn't take care of themselves at an advanced age.

My grandmother is 90. Her time is coming, but right now she lives on her own because she is able to care for herself. The second that it is felt she is unable to do so is the second we begin making tough choices for her.

Dave Lane
11-20-2012, 06:47 AM
He's a complete idiot troll what do you expect?

Dave Lane
11-20-2012, 06:49 AM
My grandma lasted until she was 96 before we had to remove her from "her longtime home" She did make it to 105

headsnap
11-20-2012, 07:01 AM
I find it absolutely despicable that you would attempt to use this as some sort of political thing. This was obviously a case where they couldn't take care of themselves at an advanced age.

My grandmother is 90. Her time is coming, but right now she lives on her own because she is able to care for herself. The second that it is felt she is unable to do so is the second we begin making tough choices for her.

are you part of the 'Office of Aging'?

3rd&48ers
11-20-2012, 07:07 AM
I find it absolutely despicable that you would attempt to use this as some sort of political thing. This was obviously a case where they couldn't take care of themselves at an advanced age.

My grandmother is 90. Her time is coming, but right now she lives on her own because she is able to care for herself. The second that it is felt she is unable to do so is the second we begin making tough choices for her.

You are so damn dumb man, I swear to God, people could do it right in front of you and you would still not believe it.

BucEyedPea
11-20-2012, 07:21 AM
are you part of the 'Office of Aging'?

ROFLLMAO

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 07:33 AM
You are so damn dumb man, I swear to God, people could do it right in front of you and you would still not believe it.

Great big conspiracy theorist you. Riddle me this: If they are suffering from dementia should they be allowed to live on their own? If their children were so concerned with this why have they allowed them to live with a loss of capacity to reason for 5 years?

If they cannot take care of themselves and the children have done nothing about it for 5 years then what should be done?

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 07:33 AM
are you part of the 'Office of Aging'?

No, I deal with it then instead of waiting 5 years for the Office of Aging to get involved.

Brainiac
11-20-2012, 07:34 AM
I find it absolutely despicable that you would attempt to use this as some sort of political thing. This was obviously a case where they couldn't take care of themselves at an advanced age.

My grandmother is 90. Her time is coming, but right now she lives on her own because she is able to care for herself. The second that it is felt she is unable to do so is the second we begin making tough choices for her.
It's entirely possible that the old couple is not capable of taking care of themselves. But it wasn't obvious to me from the article.

It would have been nice if actual examples had been given that prove the case. All we really have is the stated opinion of some bureaucrat doctor.

loochy
11-20-2012, 07:37 AM
Well, I declare J Diddy is not capable of taking care of himself.

Off to the nursing home you go! Say goodbye to your home forever.

How would you like that?

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 07:38 AM
It's entirely possible that the old couple is not capable of taking care of themselves. But it wasn't obvious to me from the article.

It would have been nice if actual examples had been given that prove the case. All we really have is the stated opinion of some bureaucrat doctor.

A doctor who swore an oath to do no harm. One who stated that they have not possessed the ability to reason in half a decade. I would be inclined to think his verdict on this decision was well concluded, but I concede that, although very unlikely, it could be part of a giant granny grabbing scheme.

jiveturkey
11-20-2012, 07:39 AM
So county gov now equals big gov?

I thought that the conservative argument pushed for more localized government. If they're abusing their powers then you can vote someone else in or you get to move to a different county. This is how a lot of states rights debates are settled.

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 07:40 AM
Well, I declare J Diddy is not capable of taking care of himself.

Off to the nursing home you go! Say goodbye to your home forever.

How would you like that?

Are you a doctor? Have I been suffering from dementia for 5 years?

If both are true then I wouldn't mind due to the fact that you are qualified to make that assumption and that I have dementia.

cosmo20002
11-20-2012, 07:51 AM
Big Gubment at it's Finest... I will never live this long but to those of you blesses with longevity genes ... Keep voting for this shit..



In May 1964, Nels and Irene Highberg bought their first and only home. It was a modest, brick rancher -- no garage -- on a pleasant cul-de-sac on the edge of East Petersburg.
The Highbergs raised two sons there. They entertained neighbors there. They grew old there.
After 48 years at 6312 Miriam Circle, the Highbergs -- Nels is 92, Irene is 89 -- figured they could manage a while longer. Family and friends agreed.
But the county Office of Aging stepped in last summer, saying for safety reasons the Highbergs must move to a nursing home.
"I ain't going to go," Highberg said, according to Erick Highberg, the couple's 54-year-old son.
When a van arrived Aug. 2 to take the couple to Oak Leaf Manor in Millersville, Highberg sat in a chair in the driveway for many long minutes. He got in the van only after a police officer showed up.
"He respected her uniform," said Erick Highberg, noting his father's more than 20 years of service in the Navy and Coast Guard.
Mrs. Highberg said in a phone interview she got in the van to see what the nursing home was like. "I didn't understand we would be locked up here," she said. "They brought us in here, and they kind of disappeared real quick."
Now, after more than three months at Oak Leaf Manor, Mrs. Highberg still wants to return home.
"If I have to be here, it couldn't be better," she said. "It's a very nice place. The rooms are nice and clean, and the food is good, and they have entertainment, and we get out to do some things, musicals and such once in a while. Really, you wonder what the heck I'm complaining about. Well, it's not my house."
What prompted the Office of Aging's action was receipt June 10 of a "report of need" from a party the agency, by law, may not disclose.
The party, according to a court document, said Mrs. Highberg was confused and unable to care for herself, yet she was caring for "her incapacitated husband when she was in all likelihood more confused than he."
The Office of Aging then conducted an investigation that included a medical exam at the Highbergs' home by Dr. Robert M. Howse Jr., a geriatrics specialist. The doctor recommended placement in a dementia unit and appointment of a guardian to oversee the couple's affairs. He wrote that the Highbergs had lost the capacity for sound decision-making as long ago as January 2007.


Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/780904_Elderly-couple-removed--from-longtime-home--family--friend-dispute-Office-of-Aging-findings.html#ixzz2Clb3xvOj

The only facts presented in the story are that the husband was incapacitated and the wife was confused and unable to care for herself. Maybe that is completely untrue, but it isn't refuted anywhere in the story. Not sure of the point of the story or you posting it.

Brainiac
11-20-2012, 07:51 AM
A doctor who swore an oath to do no harm. One who stated that they have not possessed the ability to reason in half a decade. I would be inclined to think his verdict on this decision was well concluded, but I concede that, although very unlikely, it could be part of a giant granny grabbing scheme.
A bureacrat who offered no evidence to support his claim.

His statement that they have not possessed the ability to reason since 2007 is actually just inflammatory bullshit if it's not backed up by a shred of evidence, and it sounds like a fucking bureacrat trying to cover his own ass. You may decide to find it convincing. I don't.

I realize that it's a lot easier to mock this with inflammatory language of your own than it is to suggest that somebody actually check this out. But sometimes actually checking things out is the right thing to do.

loochy
11-20-2012, 07:52 AM
A doctor who swore an oath to do no harm. One who stated that they have not possessed the ability to reason in half a decade. I would be inclined to think his verdict on this decision was well concluded, but I concede that, although very unlikely, it could be part of a giant granny grabbing scheme.

And they've been fine for half a decade too, right? I just keep thinking about how distressed and angry and hopeless I would feel if someone just whisked me away and I could never go home again. I'd probably rather die, especially if I was that age.

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 07:55 AM
A bureacrat who offered no evidence to support his claim.

His statement that they have not possessed the ability to reason since 2007 is actually just inflammatory bullshit if it's not backed up by a shred of evidence, and it sounds like a ****ing bureacrat trying to cover his own ass. You may decide to find it convincing. I don't.

I realize that it's a lot easier to mock this with inflammatory language of your own than it is to suggest that somebody actually check this out. But sometimes actually checking things out is the right thing to do.

Just because it was not mentioned in this article does not mean that he had no evidence to his claim.

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 07:57 AM
And they've been fine for half a decade too, right? I just keep thinking about how distressed and angry and hopeless I would feel if someone just whisked me away and I could never go home again. I'd probably rather die, especially if I was that age.
There is no reference to what actions prompted the intervention. However, assuming it was random to support your position seems silly.

cosmo20002
11-20-2012, 07:59 AM
If there's any anger over this story, it should be at the "newspaper" or whatever it is for publishing something so devoid of any relevant facts. Next up would be the poster for posting something so devoid of any relevant facts.

Fish
11-20-2012, 08:00 AM
This is "Big Government"?

I've seen this situation many times. Recently went through it with my stepmom's parents. There's never just one side to the story. And it wouldn't surprise me to find out that the elderly couple's kids were involved in the decision to move them in. These kinds of decisions are never easy for anyone involved. Usually the kids don't want to have their parents go through this, but at the same time they don't have the time or resources to provide sufficient help.

It's really sad that you'd use a story like this to voice your opinions on government.

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 08:04 AM
There are 5 pages to this article. Only the first being shown here. It does mention that the children stated they weren't allowed the option to move in but in regarding specific to her dementia the bureaucrat stated "The agency's court petition said Mrs. Highberg was 'so confused she could not even sustain a conversation. She repeatedly asked the caseworker who she was and made references to visiting the mountains."

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/780904_Elderly-couple-removed--from-longtime-home--family--friend-dispute-Office-of-Aging-findings.html#ixzz2Cm8PY7OL

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 08:06 AM
If there's any anger over this story, it should be at the "newspaper" or whatever it is for publishing something so devoid of any relevant facts. Next up would be the poster for posting something so devoid of any relevant facts.
Like I said. Much more to the article than what is posted on this page.

Brainiac
11-20-2012, 08:09 AM
Just because it was not mentioned in this article does not mean that he had no evidence to his claim.
So, one of two things happened here:

(1) The story was complete bullshit, and the removal of the couple was completely justified, or
(2) It was a legitimate story, and the removal of the couple was not justified.

Apparently you automatically choose to assume #1. The problem with that is that sometimes bureaucrats make bad decisions, either because they're incompetent, overworked, underpaid, lazy, or they simply don't care.

Since someone felt it was important enough to write a story about it, I don't see the harm in asking a third party to check it out. If it turns out the story was just a hatchet job, there's no harm done. But if the bureaucrat DID make a bad decision, it's a chance to save somebody's life from being ruined.

It doesn't seem like too much of a price to pay to me, and I know exactly what it's like to have to put a parent into a nursing home because they can no longer care for themselves. I've done it. It was one of the hardest decisions of my life.

Brainiac
11-20-2012, 08:15 AM
There are 5 pages to this article. Only the first being shown here. It does mention that the children stated they weren't allowed the option to move in but in regarding specific to her dementia the bureaucrat stated "The agency's court petition said Mrs. Highberg was 'so confused she could not even sustain a conversation. She repeatedly asked the caseworker who she was and made references to visiting the mountains."

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/780904_Elderly-couple-removed--from-longtime-home--family--friend-dispute-Office-of-Aging-findings.html#ixzz2Cm8PY7OL
The other four pages of the article support the argument that the Office of Aging made an arbitrary decision that went AGAINST the wishes of the family.

I really don't understand why anyone would defend this decision. It sounds pretty fucked up to me.

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 08:16 AM
So, one of two things happened here:

(1) The story was complete bullshit, and the removal of the couple was completely justified, or
(2) It was a legitimate story, and the removal of the couple was not justified.

Apparently you automatically choose to assume #1. The problem with that is that sometimes bureaucrats make bad decisions, either because they're incompetent, overworked, underpaid, lazy, or they simply don't care.

Since someone felt it was important enough to write a story about it, I don't see the harm in asking a third party to check it out. If it turns out the story was just a hatchet job, there's no harm done. But if the bureaucrat DID make a bad decision, it's a chance to save somebody's life from being ruined.

It doesn't seem like too much of a price to pay to me, and I know exactly what it's like to have to put a parent into a nursing home because they can no longer care for themselves. I've done it. It was one of the hardest decisions of my life.

I never said I had a problem with anything being checked out. Of course it should be checked out. However there are 3 mentions of symptoms specific to dementia--2 by the children. 1) AoA stated that she couldn't carry on a conversation-with examples 2) Children took them to eat and they got confused and 3)despite living where they have been for decades they can't drive because "they would just lost"

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 08:17 AM
The other four pages of the article support the argument that the Office of Aging made an arbitrary decision that went AGAINST the wishes of the family.

I really don't understand why anyone would defend this decision. It sounds pretty ****ed up to me.

With all due respect, if she could not carry on a conversation as stated in the court report and the family went on and did nothing, why should they listen to the family?

Brainiac
11-20-2012, 08:22 AM
I never said I had a problem with anything being checked out. Of course it should be checked out. However there are 3 mentions of symptoms specific to dementia--2 by the children. 1) AoA stated that she couldn't carry on a conversation-with examples 2) Children took them to eat and they got confused and 3)despite living where they have been for decades they can't drive because "they would just lost"

With all due respect, if she could not carry on a conversation as stated in the court report and the family went on and did nothing, why should they listen to the family?
I don't think we read the same article. The family opposed the forced removal of this couple from their home, and the neighbors agreed with the family.

The bureaucrat had ONE conversation with her and concluded that she couldn't carry on a conversation and has been senile since 2007.

I stand by my original suggestion: get a second opinion. If the family had agreed with the bureaucrat's decision, it would be a totally different situation. But they don't agree. That's a problem.

Dick Bull
11-20-2012, 08:32 AM
I don't think we read the same article. The family opposed the forced removal of this couple from their home, and the neighbors agreed with the family.

The bureaucrat had ONE conversation with her and concluded that she couldn't carry on a conversation and has been senile since 2007.

I stand by my original suggestion: get a second opinion. If the family had agreed with the bureaucrat's decision, it would be a totally different situation. But they don't agree. That's a problem.

First I'd like to point out that you are assuming this person is a bureaucrat. That his only goal is to remove people from homes. This has not been the case as stated here: In each of the past three years, the Office of Aging investigated an average of 1,300 reports of suspected abuse, neglect or financial exploitation. About 640 of those cases had merit, and the office each year sought guardianship in about 70 cases.

Second, leaving them there to fend for themselves when the.y are incapable of doing so is just like child abuse. They felt they were in danger and made a move. How would you feel if they investigated, didn't make a move, and suddenly everything went to hell? Would it still be there fault?

Third, like I said. There's no mention of not being allowed to get a second opinion.

dirk digler
11-20-2012, 08:37 AM
The other four pages of the article support the argument that the Office of Aging made an arbitrary decision that went AGAINST the wishes of the family.

I really don't understand why anyone would defend this decision. It sounds pretty fucked up to me.

From the article a judge made the final decision after listening to testimony.

I agree it is sad and if the family members were willing to move in I don't understand why they couldn't do that.

dirk digler
11-20-2012, 08:40 AM
Also this is a perfect example for making sure your parents have assigned someone POA just in case.

FishingRod
11-20-2012, 08:58 AM
This is one of those story’s setup to piss me off because I detest Government meddling and knowing what is best for people regardless if they like it or not but, there frankly isn’t enough information to form an intelligent opinion. It is quite likely that this was the best that could be made of a bad situation. If there are living children of these people, shame on them for not taking care of this situation. I’ve been there, and done it, and it sucks but, sometime you have to put you big-boy pants on and take care of business.

Bob Dole
11-20-2012, 09:00 AM
Bob Dole can understand why the woman repeatedly asked the caseworker who she was.

"Who are you again? And why are you here? GTFO of my house!"

Brock
11-20-2012, 09:13 AM
Hell, it was probably one of the sons who called them in to begin with.

Cave Johnson
11-20-2012, 10:05 AM
"What prompted the Office of Aging's action was receipt June 10 of a "report of need" from a party the agency, by law, may not disclose."


I assume this "Office of Aging" will be working hand-in-hand with the Death Panel...

Death panels are a creation of your and Sarah Palin's overactive imaginations, but hey, keep f'ing that chicken.

Brainiac
11-21-2012, 07:33 AM
Death panels are a creation of your and Sarah Palin's overactive imaginations, but hey, keep f'ing that chicken.
True, this is more of an incarceration panel than a death panel.

Cave Johnson
11-21-2012, 08:21 AM
True, this is more of an incarceration panel than a death panel.

News flash: judges decide the fate of incapacitated people on a regular basis.

3rd&48ers
11-21-2012, 08:22 AM
Death panels are a creation of your and Sarah Palin's overactive imaginations, but hey, keep f'ing that chicken.

Little by little things change... You won't be exempt just because you agree.

Cave Johnson
11-21-2012, 08:23 AM
Little by little things change... You won't be exempt just because you agree.

Slippery slopes, oh noes!!!

Fat Elvis
11-21-2012, 08:45 AM
The Olmstead decision guarantees the right of anyone to live in their own home and/or community regardless the severity of their disability.

Moreover, the fact that they have lived in a nursing facility for 90 days (might be 180 days federally) also means that they have the right to have the amount funding that they recieved to live in a nursing facility follow them into the community for at least one year so that they may recieve home and community based services.

Brock
11-21-2012, 08:46 AM
Little by little things change... You won't be exempt just because you agree.

LMAO

"I've fallen on the tub and I can't get up"

Fat Elvis
11-21-2012, 08:54 AM
Big Gubment at it's Finest... I will never live this long but to those of you blesses with longevity genes ... Keep voting for this shit..





The Obama administration, contrary to your understanding of this situation, has been the most active administration in enforcing Olmstead--so yes, I will keep voting for "this shit."

You are just another example of the moronic republican echo chamber who does not live in the world of facts and/or has a very limited understanding of the world around them.

Fish
11-21-2012, 09:15 AM
Little by little things change... You won't be exempt just because you agree.

You damn whippersnappers and your damn changes and whatnots!

http://img547.imageshack.us/img547/6352/grandpasimpsonyellingat.jpg

lewdog
11-21-2012, 05:17 PM
I deal with Dementia on a daily basis at work and it is amazing/scary it is for many of these people I see to be continuing to live in their houses or drive. Many times family members are so uneducated about the effects of dementia on completing even simple daily living tasks.

To me this sounds like the possibility of the two sons not agreeing on their parents condition and the parents did not have a designated POA. Or it could have been that the family was not providing enough sound care-taking for their parents and neighbors possibly reported neglect.

Without this report telling the "reporting party" I have no idea how you can think this is a government thing? Elder abuse/neglect is very real and you have no idea the circumstances these parents were really in based on this article which only talks to the family.

VAChief
11-21-2012, 05:46 PM
You are so damn dumb man, I swear to God, people could do it right in front of you and you would still not believe it.

Oh the irony considering the sources you believe.

ROYC75
11-23-2012, 12:37 PM
That's sad, all of those years together. Here is the story of a little old lady that lived by us.

I took care of the yard and some house maintenance for her after we bought our house. She was 80 at the time with little family since she never married. She had owned the house for 50 years and it was rough inside and out. But it was her house and she was proud of it, didn't ask for anybody's help by way of money but was always willing to pay. The first 8 years I lived here, I accepted no money for anything, mowing, minor repairs, etc. I was taught to help the elderly, they help build this great nation we live in.

Then one day my leaf blower stopped working, finally gave out and died. I went to the local Stihl shop here and bought a new one. She seen I had a new one and every time I would do something, she offered to pay.

This time, I said yes, basically because I just spent $ 120.00 to buy myself a new leaf blower. She carefully folded the money up for me to not see the amount. I took it and put it in my pocket as to not look like I wanted to see the amount. I got home, pulled it out and it was $ 100.00. I immediately went back over telling her that she had to of made a mistake on the amount thinking it was a $ 10.00.

She told me No, I knew how much it was and this is the 1st time you took money from me and I want you to have it. You just bought a new machine to do my yard and I Thank You for it.She never let me go again without paying.

When the day came the Social Workers came calling to check up on her, she let them in. But it was the last time they came in, she wouldn't answer the door, only allowing me to talk to them. She wouldn't let the police in, it was her home and they were not welcomed. This went on for another year and finally, one day she never answered the door. Her niece came and asked me to go to the door with her, yet no answer. I had to break a window to let my daughter in, opened the door and found her dead in bed. She had died in her sleep, the way she wanted to in her home that she treasured. She was 92, had taken care of herself her whole life, had saved up thousand of dollars in a bank account, stocks & bonds.

I lived next door to this little old lady for 12 years, the grand kids got attached to her, as she did them. I was asked to be a pall bearer at her funeral and got a little surprise. Each time I had mowed her yard or done something the first 8 years, she took the money and stuck it in a coffee can with a lid. It had my name marked on it so when her niece found it, she brought it to me. There was a note in it that said Please give this to Roy when I die. It had a Thank You note in it for being a friend and allowing me to live my life, my way. The can had $ 850.00 in it, I never took it. I told her to take it and use it on the funeral, flowers, anything to give this woman a funeral going out with a bang!

I can tell you first hand, somebody living in their home until they die is a serious thing. Their pride and freedom is a valued treasure to them.

Fish
11-23-2012, 01:55 PM
Here's a story:

I lived in a house over in the Waldo area for quite a few years. There was an older woman living by herself in the house across the street. She was a very smart lady, and had all of her senses about her. But she could barely get around at all. She had a walker she used, but even then she wasn't the least bit mobile. I enjoyed chatting with her, cause she was a very rambunctious lady who cursed like a drunk sailor on occasion. And she had a fascinating outlook on life. I would shovel her driveway when it snowed, and helped her carry groceries in and such. She had kids, but they were complete shitheads who cared nothing for her and lived across the country. They tried a few times to get her into an assisted facility, but she outright refused. Her kids didn't care enough to push the matter. I ended up moving, as did the other nearby neighbor that had often helped out the lady as well. I found out later that Jan ended up dying in her home shortly after. It happened in February during very cold weather. Nobody checked up on her until 2 months or so after she'd died. By then, it was spring, but her heater had been set to 80 for months. Her cats ran out of food, and started feasting on her decomposing body. The coroner had to enter the house in a hazmat suit.

Sometimes the hard decision of requiring assisted living for someone who needs it must come from an outside party, or it might not otherwise come at all.

lewdog
11-23-2012, 07:01 PM
Here's a story:

I lived in a house over in the Waldo area for quite a few years. There was an older woman living by herself in the house across the street. She was a very smart lady, and had all of her senses about her. But she could barely get around at all. She had a walker she used, but even then she wasn't the least bit mobile. I enjoyed chatting with her, cause she was a very rambunctious lady who cursed like a drunk sailor on occasion. And she had a fascinating outlook on life. I would shovel her driveway when it snowed, and helped her carry groceries in and such. She had kids, but they were complete shitheads who cared nothing for her and lived across the country. They tried a few times to get her into an assisted facility, but she outright refused. Her kids didn't care enough to push the matter. I ended up moving, as did the other nearby neighbor that had often helped out the lady as well. I found out later that Jan ended up dying in her home shortly after. It happened in February during very cold weather. Nobody checked up on her until 2 months or so after she'd died. By then, it was spring, but her heater had been set to 80 for months. Her cats ran out of food, and started feasting on her decomposing body. The coroner had to enter the house in a hazmat suit.

Sometimes the hard decision of requiring assisted living for someone who needs it must come from an outside party, or it might not otherwise come at all.

Perfect example. Elder abuse/neglect usually comes from family members who are unaccepting of their parents change in condition and ability to complete tasks of daily living. Their parents meanwhile, suffer from some form of dementia and are usually unaware themselves. These people have to be pushed by a third party or you end of my more stories of people dying suddenly in their home or worse, hurting someone else (those still driving).

ROYC75
11-26-2012, 10:39 AM
Bottom line, there are always exceptions to the rule. The families of the elderly have to be able to make the decisions that best suit the elderly involved.

The sad part is when there is no family and the health officials have to step in.

tooge
11-26-2012, 12:09 PM
ya know, If I'm 90 years old and some cop comes to force me to leave my house because someone complained that I was unable to take care of myself, I'd sit in the house with my gun pointed at the door and take the first poor soul that opened it with me.

Dick Bull
11-26-2012, 12:10 PM
Here's a story:

I lived in a house over in the Waldo area for quite a few years. There was an older woman living by herself in the house across the street. She was a very smart lady, and had all of her senses about her. But she could barely get around at all. She had a walker she used, but even then she wasn't the least bit mobile. I enjoyed chatting with her, cause she was a very rambunctious lady who cursed like a drunk sailor on occasion. And she had a fascinating outlook on life. I would shovel her driveway when it snowed, and helped her carry groceries in and such. She had kids, but they were complete shitheads who cared nothing for her and lived across the country. They tried a few times to get her into an assisted facility, but she outright refused. Her kids didn't care enough to push the matter. I ended up moving, as did the other nearby neighbor that had often helped out the lady as well. I found out later that Jan ended up dying in her home shortly after. It happened in February during very cold weather. Nobody checked up on her until 2 months or so after she'd died. By then, it was spring, but her heater had been set to 80 for months. Her cats ran out of food, and started feasting on her decomposing body. The coroner had to enter the house in a hazmat suit.

Sometimes the hard decision of requiring assisted living for someone who needs it must come from an outside party, or it might not otherwise come at all.

That is a horrible story. I can't believe in a 2 month time span, the children didn't push the matter of not being able to get a hold of her or the neighbors not noticing anything.

Dick Bull
11-26-2012, 12:11 PM
ya know, If I'm 90 years old and some cop comes to force me to leave my house because someone complained that I was unable to take care of myself, I'd sit in the house with my gun pointed at the door and take the first poor soul that opened it with me.

That is not rational thought.