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FAX
12-13-2012, 10:24 AM
I had this awesome dog named Mack who was part something and part Chow. I met him in my office building one day. He was a hobo puppy that the girls who owned the advertising agency next door found somewhere and rescued by bringing him to their office. I was walking down the hall one day and he was staring at me through their glass door. He looked like a tiny, friendly, miniature bear. I introduced myself and he seemed to think I was okay. I later mentioned this encounter to the beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX and the next day she came sauntering into my office with the dog, a brand new leash, and a half-dozen or so milk bone biscuits.

Mack kept me around for about 10 years, I guess. Several years ago, he contracted thyroid cancer. He went through surgery okay and got better for a year or so, then he finally just succumbed to the disease ... couldn't eat, couldn't poop properly, in obvious pain ... after one particularly rough episode, I took him to the vet so he could get some relief. Bad day.

After that, I swore that Mack would be the last dog I would ever own. I suppose I got sort of attached to the little fella. Frankly, he was an awesome assistant. He helped me dig in the garden, rake leaves, and kept me company at the office. He was good with a frisbee and stick and ball and finding creative ways to escape the radio fence because he also liked the ladies. To be honest, I think if he had been trained properly, he would have made a fantastic circus dog ... the kind that walks on barrels and jumps through flaming circles and stuff. He was extraordinarily intelligent, nimble, and fleet of foot as many a dead squirrel can attest (if, of course, it were possible for dead squirrels to attest to much of anything ... besides, I'm not sure you can trust anything a squirrel says ... dead or otherwise).

He was independent, though. He had a mind of his own and his own way of doing things. I suppose that was a result of living on the streets as a young dog. He came up the hard way and developed survival skills out of necessity. It was pretty clear that he could live on squirrels and garbage if he needed to. He wouldn't have smelled all that great, but he would have been happy.

Anyhow, I caught myself sitting here in my home office just kind of staring at the space on the floor where he used to keep his rug and I suddenly realized how much I miss him. As I mentioned, I made a pretty firm declaration that I wasn't going to get another dog after Mack on account of the separation anxiety I experienced when leaving the vet's office on that last day. But now I think I'm changing my mind about that. Dogs are pretty cool ... if you can find the right one. Maybe I'll head down to the pound later this week.

FAX THE SENTIMENTAL

bevischief
12-13-2012, 10:30 AM
Try your Craigslist. That is how I found my last dog and didn't cost me anything. Nothing wrong with the family had to down size where they lived.

Rain Man
12-13-2012, 10:33 AM
I think it's not disrespecting Mack's memory to make a good home for another pet. There are lots of unemployed animals who would really appreciate an opportunity to be your assistant, and who would strive to do a great job.

DeezNutz
12-13-2012, 10:35 AM
Try your Craigslist. That is how I found my last dog and didn't cost me anything. Nothing wrong with the family had to down size where they lived.

Yeah, you have to be careful there. Sometimes a dog will solicit for someone to come over to brush its tail while its litter-mate watches, and these are tough rules to play by.

OnTheWarpath58
12-13-2012, 10:37 AM
I'm with you, MR. FAX. My pup passed on Tuesday night of bone cancer. There's not a spot in the house or the yard that doesn't remind me of her.

Like you, I've swore I'll never get another dog after our Brittany Spaniel passes on. She's confused as all hell too - looking around the house wondering where her friend is.

Sorry for your loss. Hope you find what you're looking for with your next pup, should you go that route.

mdchiefsfan
12-13-2012, 10:54 AM
I think it's not disrespecting Mack's memory to make a good home for another pet. There are lots of unemployed animals who would really appreciate an opportunity to be your assistant, and who would strive to do a great job.

:thumb:

BIG_DADDY
12-13-2012, 10:56 AM
I hate losing dogs. Best of luck to you in finding a new friend. I am sure you will do fine.

tooge
12-13-2012, 10:57 AM
It's actually a pretty bad job market out there for dogs. Lots of dogs, many less positions. I'd create a job if I were you and help one of them out.

Mr. Flopnuts
12-13-2012, 10:57 AM
Get another dog. They're truly man's best friend. I wasn't allowed to have one as a kid, and while mine is 8 years old and I hopefully have a few more years with her, I have no doubt I'll be a dog companion for life. I like having her around. I got me 2 bitches! :D

htismaqe
12-13-2012, 10:58 AM
I love the idea of rescuing a dog from the pound.

But I wouldn't recommend it at this point.

I got a 7-month old Catahoula in Maryville MO last summer.

He digs, he chews, he tries to bite, he hides under the porch whenever you get close...

He's mentally damaged and despite professional training and a lot of one-on-one time, he's nearly impossible to manage.

seclark
12-13-2012, 11:27 AM
put old gabby(lab) down last fathers day. figured i'd go awhile without a dog, but lately i've been thinking of getting another one. the old doghouse is looking pretty empty, and to be honest, after she was gone, nobody really acted like they gave a fuck when i got home from work.
sec

gblowfish
12-13-2012, 11:39 AM
The pain we feel when we lose a pet is terrible. But our lives are much richer for sharing it with them. The give you unconditional love, which money can't buy. A couple of my kitties are getting older, it's going to be crushing when they pass on. But I can't imagine not giving them a forever home. It was, and is, the right thing to do. I hope you you'll open your heart and give another puppy a chance to be your best friend.

FAX
12-13-2012, 11:50 AM
I think it's not disrespecting Mack's memory to make a good home for another pet. There are lots of unemployed animals who would really appreciate an opportunity to be your assistant, and who would strive to do a great job.

The main reason I decided I didn't want another dog was just based on the fact that I got awfully attached to Mack and I don't particularly enjoy the sensation of emotional "loss". It seems to me there is one really easy way to avoid that and it's to simply refuse to get a new dog.

Plus ... you're kind of right, Mr. Rain Man ... I know it sounds silly and probably a little crazy, too ... but there's a part of me that does sort of feel as though I'd be trying to replace something that's irreplaceable. And I admit that I'd probably feel a little funny at first if I got a new dog and he started playing with Mack's ball or sleeping on his rug or whatever. On the other hand, if a dog walked in here right now and started chewing on Mack's weasel toy, at least it's being used by somebody (the beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX hardly ever chews on that weasel toy), and that would be a good thing.

But then there's the part that is pretty convinced that I'll never ever find a dog that is as intelligent as Mack was. I mean, the fact is that there's no possible way I could get a "better" dog ... unless it was some kind of bizarre mutant dog that could actually speak English words and carry on a conversation or play board games or something like that. The odds are slim that I can find a dog that is even halfway good at Monopoly or Clue. And generally speaking, the ones that try almost always accuse Mrs. Peacock in the Kitchen with the Rope which gets boring.

So, I don't want a new dog because I don't want the potential pain associated with getting attached ... on the other hand, I'm sitting here feeling a little bad anyhow because Mack's not here and his rug is empty. It's a no-win deal right now. I think I'll go check out the pound.

FAX

bevischief
12-13-2012, 11:55 AM
My other dog I got by while I just put my lab down and was calling the local rescues and getting my name on a list and back ground check from my vet. The local vet tech had a dog she needed to find a home for. She called and brought the dog over and the dog never left.

FAX
12-13-2012, 11:56 AM
I love the idea of rescuing a dog from the pound.

But I wouldn't recommend it at this point.

I got a 7-month old Catahoula in Maryville MO last summer.

He digs, he chews, he tries to bite, he hides under the porch whenever you get close...

He's mentally damaged and despite professional training and a lot of one-on-one time, he's nearly impossible to manage.

You have to be careful, that's for sure.

It's funny, though ... I've owned or been around a lot of pure-bred dogs in my life ... labs, setters, pugs, pointers, etc. ... but of all the dogs I've owned, the two that were the best (by far and away) were mutts. One was a German Shepherd mix when I was a kid and the other was Mack. I think there's something to the idea that too much in-breeding creates a dumbass dog.

I understand and appreciate your words of wisdom and caution, Mr. htismaqe, but Mack set a pretty high bar and I'm going to be very selective if I decide to get a new one.

FAX

FAX
12-13-2012, 11:57 AM
My other dog I got by while I just put my lab down and was calling the local rescues and getting my name on a list and back ground check from my vet. The local vet tech had a dog she needed to find a home for. She called and brought the dog over and the dog never left.

Hmmm ... that's an idea I'd never considered, Mr. bevischief. Our vet might be an interesting potential resource. Never would have thought of that.

FAX

duncan_idaho
12-13-2012, 12:15 PM
I was not a big dog person for a LONG time... severe allergies made it pretty impossible. About 2 years ago, I started taking allergy shots. They have been remarkably effective, and a year ago in August, we adopted our Scott (my wife found pictures on him on the KC Humane Society website and we fell in love).

It's changed my life. My blood pressure has gone down 10 points since we got him. I chalk this up to working from home and having him around to calm me down periodically (nothing like getting off the phone after yelling at someone and being able to turn around, pet my dog, and relax for 5 minutes).

He went through a lot of trauma early on - he was found on the streets of Joplin after the tornado, and one of his eyes was infected/messed up - but you wouldn't know it from his demeanor. He's incredibly sweet, cuddly, and LOVES people. They ended up bringing him to KC, where they had to remove his eye. This handicap kept him from being adopted (because he's otherwise just a handsome guy).

Here's a pic (he's the one on the left)

http://i46.tinypic.com/u4w0m.jpg

FAX, I think if you find the RIGHT shelter and the RIGHT dog, it's not an problem. Most of them will give you a chance to meet/play with a dog before you adopt it, so that helps a lot.

As a fellow former "I don't need a dog" guy, what you said touched me. Hope you find another little guy or gal who can fill that spot in your life.

Phobia
12-13-2012, 12:25 PM
I hope you're not so damaged that a new dog will not select you to be their new friend, FAX. But you'll never know unless you try. Maybe there will be one willing to forgive your faults.

DC.chief
12-13-2012, 12:37 PM
Losing a pet is tough. I had a red husky named chief for 17 years before I had to have him put down. I told myself the same thing you did, that I couldn't handle that sort of pain again and wouldn't get another dog.

That was a few years ago now and I just got a German Shepherd recently. She's 4.5 months old now. Over time I just started to forget the pain of the loss and remember the long happy life Chief shared with me. The bond some of us have with our pets is special.

So go for it Fax. htismage has a good point about rescuing a pup from the pound. You could get an emotionally damaged dog. I tried it but didn't have success. Ended up finding my German Shepherd from puppyfinder.com

HemiEd
12-13-2012, 12:41 PM
It's actually a pretty bad job market out there for dogs. Lots of dogs, many less positions. I'd create a job if I were you and help one of them out.

This. Sorry to hear about you losing your companion Fax.


As I started to post in OTWP58s thread yesterday, we are very attached to our 12 year old world record sized Yorkie. (16 pounds) We got him as a 6 week old pup, and my wife took him to obedience classes early on.

A year and a half ago now, we decided that we wanted to hedge our bet, and get another one to learn from Toto, and also avoid the complete void and heartache that would be left when we lose him.

Many years ago, our 12 year old German Shepard passed on Fathers day, and it still bothers me to this day. We tried numerous dogs to replace him, but none could measure up.

My older sister, has been a volunteer at the Humane Society since she retired, so we had her keep an eye out. She found Coco for us, a 4 pound female 3 years old, that was just too much trouble for the daughter of the previous owner who had passed away. We are so glad.

At first, they didn't get along at all, and Toto was very jealous.

But now, since Toto has never been a barker, she is his steward. She lets us know when he needs to go out, and when he is ready to come back in. She smells his butt, and will also make sure he knows it is time for him to do his business.

They are quite the pair, and I think he has forgotten about the time when he was an "only dog."

So in a long winded way, that is my recommendation, get two, especially if it will provide a new home for an abandoned dog.

Frosty
12-13-2012, 12:42 PM
I love the idea of rescuing a dog from the pound.

But I wouldn't recommend it at this point.

I got a 7-month old Catahoula in Maryville MO last summer.

He digs, he chews, he tries to bite, he hides under the porch whenever you get close...

He's mentally damaged and despite professional training and a lot of one-on-one time, he's nearly impossible to manage.


I had the same experience. I just didn't have the experience or patience to deal with it so we had to take him back (fortunately, someone else adopted him). I ended up buying a purebred Aussie from a local breeder and she has been an awesome dog. Unfortunately, she's over 14 years old now so we'll probably be facing this sooner rather than later. :huh: Other than being deaf now, though, she's in great shape.

Aussies are "dogs for dummies" as they are so smart and easy to train. They are also active, so you have to have a decent sized yard. I would like another one when she's gone but may go with a different breed so we can get something smaller.

Phobia
12-13-2012, 12:52 PM
This. Sorry to hear about you losing your companion Fax.


As I started to post in OTWP58s thread yesterday, we are very attached to our 12 year old world record sized Yorkie. (16 pounds) We got him as a 6 week old pup, and my wife took him to obedience classes early on.

A year and a half ago now, we decided that we wanted to hedge our bet, and get another one to learn from Toto, and also avoid the complete void and heartache that would be left when we lose him.

Many years ago, our 12 year old German Shepard passed on Fathers day, and it still bothers me to this day. We tried numerous dogs to replace him, but none could measure up.

My older sister, has been a volunteer at the Humane Society since she retired, so we had her keep an eye out. She found Coco for us, a 4 pound female 3 years old, that was just too much trouble for the daughter of the previous owner who had passed away. We are so glad.

At first, they didn't get along at all, and Toto was very jealous.

But now, since Toto has never been a barker, she is his steward. She lets us know when he needs to go out, and when he is ready to come back in. She smells his butt, and will also make sure he knows it is time for him to do his business.

They are quite the pair, and I think he has forgotten about the time when he was an "only dog."

So in a long winded way, that is my recommendation, get two, especially if it will provide a new home for an abandoned dog.

I had that way of thinking when we got our Morkie companion for our old Maltese almost 3 years ago. But the Morkie never seemed to learn anything from the older dog. He seemed to be so stupid that the wife tried to give him away several months ago. I stopped that because I figured we had already suffered through the worst of it. Shortly after the old Maltese died, Oliver started communicating with us, his affection increased, and he hasn't shit or pissed in the house at all. I can't explain it. He's awesome now but for the first 2.5 years he was a handful.

HemiEd
12-13-2012, 01:00 PM
I had that way of thinking when we got our Morkie companion for our old Maltese almost 3 years ago. But the Morkie never seemed to learn anything from the older dog. He seemed to be so stupid that the wife tried to give him away several months ago. I stopped that because I figured we had already suffered through the worst of it. Shortly after the old Maltese died, Oliver started communicating with us, his affection increased, and he hasn't shit or pissed in the house at all. I can't explain it. He's awesome now but for the first 2.5 years he was a handful.

I am glad to hear Oliver got better when it was his time to shine. I am convinced that dogs are very much like humans, and each have a personality of their own.

It would seem that Oliver respected the seniority of your Maltese, or the Maltese was dominant and made Oliver miserable.

We probably just got lucky, but it hilarious just how dominate the little gal Coco is. All the toys are hers, as are all three of the dog beds, and Toto seems to have accepted it. He draws the line at the chow bowl though, she keeps her distance until he is through.

Phobia
12-13-2012, 01:05 PM
Old Bogey was the most docile creature ever. But he communicated well and I guess the younger Oliver just depended on him to tell us when they needed something. I figure the puppy added a couple years of life to Bogey as well. He was almost 13 but showing some warning signs of impending death when we purchased the new dog. But dog behavior is something that never ceases to amaze me. Dogs do the strangest things but when you look back on their behavior, it usually makes sense in some way even if you were befuddled at the time.

HemiEd
12-13-2012, 01:09 PM
I agree, dogs are a marvel.

It sounds like you agree though, that having Oliver helped both Bogey and your family when it came time to deal with the loss?

Rausch
12-13-2012, 01:20 PM
Amazing how they become a part of you.

When I lost my place and scratched out a GoChiefs living in Mom's downstairs her lab pissed on the corner of the couch where my head was for the first week.

EVERY SINGLE DAY woke up with the strong smell of about 2 gallons of dog urine right below me.

He never did that before. Apparently he did not approve of the new male (his old master, my mom's fiance had recently passed) and he displayed as much.

I lost my temper one night and punched the $3it out of him while he was marking his territory by my face.

That night I came home and sat in the garage having a beer or 12 and a smoke. Apparently the dog loved to go down there in the summer and lay on the cold concrete.

That night we "bonded" and he never pissed in the house again. Every time I came home he'd come down and scratch at the door if I didn't let him in the garage. I'd come home from the factory smelling like bigfoot's d!ck but as soon as he heard me pop a top he was at the door.

There was many a night I sat there and drank with him before I showered up while me and the Mrs. were separated.

I miss that dog...

Phobia
12-13-2012, 01:24 PM
I agree, dogs are a marvel.

It sounds like you agree though, that having Oliver helped both Bogey and your family when it came time to deal with the loss?

There's no doubt. Another dynamic is that my boy, Zane was about a month old when the old dog died. The emotional people in the house were too busy with other, more important issues than an extended grief period over a dog we've suspected could die any day for years.

Radar Chief
12-13-2012, 01:30 PM
Nothing, not losing friends or family, hurt as bad as putting down Phoebe the Jeep dog.

http://i49.tinypic.com/syb8e0.jpg

Afterwards I didn’t want another dog, thought it would be kind of nice living without one for a while but Mrs. Radar had other plans.
About 8 months later she took me to a local charity dog rescue to introduce me to a Catahoula they had there. I wasn’t interested but decided I’d better humor her and went.
When I reached down and scratched the Catahoula behind the ears she leaned on my leg and looked up at me with big ole puppy dog eyes and I thought, “Shit! I’ve got dog.”
At first I was a bit pissed at Mrs. Radar for shoving Rhetta, that’s what we named her, off on me because whenever I looked at her all I saw was having to put her down in 10 years or so, but she very quickly worked her way into my heart. Since I’ve learned that as dog owners we can’t dwell on how they will end, just enjoy their time with us. It may sound a bit simplistic but that is what dogs are here for, to teach our young’uns about the cycle of life and to enjoy their childlike exuberance while they’re with us.

seclark
12-13-2012, 01:34 PM
Amazing how they become a part of you.

When I lost my place and scratched out a GoChiefs living in Mom's downstairs her lab pissed on the corner of the couch where my head was for the first week.

EVERY SINGLE DAY woke up with the strong smell of about 2 gallons of dog urine right below me.

He never did that before. Apparently he did not approve of the new male (his old master, my mom's fiance had recently passed) and he displayed as much.

I lost my temper one night and punched the $3it out of him while he was marking his territory by my face.

That night I came home and sat in the garage having a beer or 12 and a smoke. Apparently the dog loved to go down there in the summer and lay on the cold concrete.

That night we "bonded" and he never pissed in the house again. Every time I came home he'd come down and scratch at the door if I didn't let him in the garage. I'd come home from the factory smelling like bigfoot's d!ck but as soon as he heard me pop a top he was at the door.

There was many a night I sat there and drank with him before I showered up while me and the Mrs. were separated.

I miss that dog...

mil had a wiener dog that she'd bring to our house every time we had a family dinner. fuckin thing'd piss or shit right in front of the kitchen sink every single time. hated that dog. when it got old, mil asked if i'd take it to the vet to be put down for her. wife picked it up and brought it home. the dog just laid in her lap while she was driving, and it got to the wife...started bawling(ffs). then the dog cut a raunchy fart on her that was so bad she had to roll the windows down.
can't tell me they don't know what's going on.
sec

htismaqe
12-13-2012, 01:37 PM
You have to be careful, that's for sure.

It's funny, though ... I've owned or been around a lot of pure-bred dogs in my life ... labs, setters, pugs, pointers, etc. ... but of all the dogs I've owned, the two that were the best (by far and away) were mutts. One was a German Shepherd mix when I was a kid and the other was Mack. I think there's something to the idea that too much in-breeding creates a dumbass dog.

I understand and appreciate your words of wisdom and caution, Mr. htismaqe, but Mack set a pretty high bar and I'm going to be very selective if I decide to get a new one.

FAX

It's not the genes with my dog. It's the fact that he spent the first 4 weeks of his life under a deck, with mange so bad that one of his siblings died from it, and then spent 7 more months in a 3x3 cage with another dog.

For the first week I had him, he went under the porch and never came out, at least not while we were around.

htismaqe
12-13-2012, 01:38 PM
I had the same experience. I just didn't have the experience or patience to deal with it so we had to take him back (fortunately, someone else adopted him). I ended up buying a purebred Aussie from a local breeder and she has been an awesome dog. Unfortunately, she's over 14 years old now so we'll probably be facing this sooner rather than later. :huh: Other than being deaf now, though, she's in great shape.

Aussies are "dogs for dummies" as they are so smart and easy to train. They are also active, so you have to have a decent sized yard. I would like another one when she's gone but may go with a different breed so we can get something smaller.

I have an acre and a half but unfortunately I can't allow him to "use" it. Too scared he'll disappear...

Or go over to the neighbors and maul somebody...

beach tribe
12-13-2012, 01:41 PM
I love the idea of rescuing a dog from the pound.

But I wouldn't recommend it at this point.

I got a 7-month old Catahoula in Maryville MO last summer.

He digs, he chews, he tries to bite, he hides under the porch whenever you get close...

He's mentally damaged and despite professional training and a lot of one-on-one time, he's nearly impossible to manage.

I adopted a Min Pin from a lady, and have spent $$ out the ass on training and shit, and the fucker is completely unmanageable.
He is a fucking NIGHTMARE.
I've had him for 3 years, only because my GF LOVES him. He had 3 owners before me, and they all begged the next one to take him.
Like you said about yours, he's damaged goods.

FAX
12-13-2012, 01:58 PM
It's not the genes with my dog. It's the fact that he spent the first 4 weeks of his life under a deck, with mange so bad that one of his siblings died from it, and then spent 7 more months in a 3x3 cage with another dog.

For the first week I had him, he went under the porch and never came out, at least not while we were around.

Damn. That's sad, Mr. htismaqe.

When they experience early, negative imprinting, it's darn difficult to get them straightened out, that's for sure.

Mack had a terrible fear of storms ... especially thunderstorms. I came to believe that, while he was living in the streets, he had probably been caught up in a storm and couldn't find shelter ... or something along those lines.

Anyhow, he hated water and despised taking baths ... and, whenever there was a thunderstorm, or on the 4th of July, or on New Year's Eve, or during any fireworks-related event, he would find the deepest, darkest, farthest corner of the basement and curl up in a ball and he wouldn't come out for love nor money nor hamburger meat.

In all other aspects, he was a brave, little guy. A true fighter when the need arose. But, I was never able to convince him that the thunder wasn't going to find him and kill him.

FAX

KC Tattoo
12-13-2012, 02:52 PM
I miss my dog Chow :deevee:

LOCOChief
12-13-2012, 03:00 PM
We'll probably have to put down Pete our 16 year old Jack Russell this week. We got him for our sons 6th birthday. The last couple of weeks have been really tough on ol Pete with back and neck pain. He pretty much has stopped eating the last couple of days so we can't keep him here much longer- probably say our goodbyes tonight. He's been a great boy and we love him and will miss him very much.

Douche Baggins
12-13-2012, 03:02 PM
Don't get a dog from the pound.

Get one from a licensed breeder.

They're far more likely to live longer and have fewer problems.

OnTheWarpath58
12-13-2012, 03:09 PM
We'll probably have to put down Pete our 16 year old Jack Russell this week. We got him for our sons 6th birthday. The last couple of weeks have been really tough on ol Pete with back and neck pain. He pretty much has stopped eating the last couple of days so we can't keep him here much longer- probably say our goodbyes tonight. He's been a great boy and we love him and will miss him very much.

That sucks. Sorry to hear.

Rausch
12-13-2012, 03:11 PM
Don't get a dog from the pound.

Get one from a licensed breeder.

They're far more likely to live longer and have fewer problems.

I've "had" 3 dogs.

A yorkie that lived 12 years, a Lab/pit/Shepherd mix that lived 14, and a pure lab that lived 12.

We got all we could expect from all of them...

HemiEd
12-13-2012, 03:17 PM
Amazing how they become a part of you.

When I lost my place and scratched out a GoChiefs living in Mom's downstairs her lab pissed on the corner of the couch where my head was for the first week.

EVERY SINGLE DAY woke up with the strong smell of about 2 gallons of dog urine right below me.

He never did that before. Apparently he did not approve of the new male (his old master, my mom's fiance had recently passed) and he displayed as much.

I lost my temper one night and punched the $3it out of him while he was marking his territory by my face.

That night I came home and sat in the garage having a beer or 12 and a smoke. Apparently the dog loved to go down there in the summer and lay on the cold concrete.

That night we "bonded" and he never pissed in the house again. Every time I came home he'd come down and scratch at the door if I didn't let him in the garage. I'd come home from the factory smelling like bigfoot's d!ck but as soon as he heard me pop a top he was at the door.

There was many a night I sat there and drank with him before I showered up while me and the Mrs. were separated.

I miss that dog...Great story, thanks for sharing it Raush.

A few years ago, I flew to NY to see a concert with my eldest daughter. They have one of those miniature Doberman dogs, Mario. I spent a lot of time with him.

When I got home, I sat down in the recliner and was reading the paper. I soon felt something warm on my leg. Toto had jumped up in the recliner, and proceeded to mark my leg. It was hard to be mad at him for pissing on me, as he had smelled Mario on me, and I belonged to him.

There's no doubt. Another dynamic is that my boy, Zane was about a month old when the old dog died. The emotional people in the house were too busy with other, more important issues than an extended grief period over a dog we've suspected could die any day for years.

Good timing on Zane and Pink's part.

htismaqe
12-13-2012, 03:24 PM
I've "had" 3 dogs.

A yorkie that lived 12 years, a Lab/pit/Shepherd mix that lived 14, and a pure lab that lived 12.

We got all we could expect from all of them...

We got our Yorkie from a local breeder. She was vibrant and healthy.

But nothing could have saved her from being a Yorkie. Most annoying fucking dog I've ever seen. But my wife just HAD to have her.

Rausch
12-13-2012, 03:28 PM
We got our Yorkie from a local breeder. She was vibrant and healthy.

But nothing could have saved her from being a Yorkie. Most annoying ****ing dog I've ever seen. But my wife just HAD to have her.

They've got ears like you can't believe. She could tell the difference between the sound of my grandfather's truck, dad's truck, and mom's car blocks away.

You could tell by the way she was circling in front of the door who was about to be there...

htismaqe
12-13-2012, 03:31 PM
They've got ears like you can't believe. She could tell the difference between the sound of my grandfather's truck, dad's truck, and mom's car blocks away.

You could tell by the way she was circling in front of the door who was about to be there...

Yep.

Was yours mean? I never thought about it when we got her but damn if she wasn't the epitome of why they call female dogs "bitches".

She was a better mouser than some of our cats, too. :D

GloryDayz
12-13-2012, 03:34 PM
The sentiment is clear, but I'll add that dew can comprehend the importance that our pets bring to our lives. I was questioned for have a hip replacement performed "on a dog." LOL, some of the best money I ever spent!

Rausch
12-13-2012, 03:41 PM
Yep.

Was yours mean?

Not at all.

Very child friendly and loved company.

If she got too much attention she'd piss the floor...

Simba
12-13-2012, 03:56 PM
Our dog passed away on Thanksgiving morning. Everything around the house reminds us of her as well. We swore we would not get another pet as the loss was just too great for us.

However, we just saw an 8-week old German Shepherd which looks and acts just like our Simba, so we adopted her. We wrestled with the "replacing" her issue, but the fact that we'd be giving a dog a good, loving home overcame that feeling.

While we miss our Simba, our new puppy does help the soften the pain of losing Simba.

LOCOChief
12-13-2012, 04:37 PM
My pup passed on Tuesday night of bone cancer. There's not a spot in the house or the yard that doesn't remind me of her.


I'm sorry to hear this.

sd4chiefs
12-13-2012, 04:53 PM
My crazy Cairn terrier was a rescue dog. He was 6 months old and we have now had him for 6 years. We have had cats over the 30 years that my wife and I have been together but I was never attached to them like I am to our dog.

He is very happy all the time and is very smart. When I watch the Chiefs play and I get upset (which is like all the time) he sits next to me with his ears down like it is his fault that I am mad. I then snap out of it and we go out in the backyard and play with the ball.

I do not want to even think about what our lives will be like when he is gone but that is like another 10 years from now I hope.

Brando
12-13-2012, 06:17 PM
Mr FAX, I'm very sorry to hear about your loss.
I had to put down my trusty companion a few years back. She had cancer and like Mack received another year or so from treatment.

You might check Petfinder. I ended up with a great Blue Heeler that was being fostered.

OnTheWarpath58
12-13-2012, 07:12 PM
Mr FAX, I'm very sorry to hear about your loss.
I had to put down my trusty companion a few years back. She had cancer and like Mack received another year or so from treatment.

You might check Petfinder. I ended up with a great Blue Heeler that was being fostered.

Holy Christ.

A Brando sighting.

mlyonsd
12-13-2012, 07:18 PM
We lost mom this year and their lab is the only thing keeping dad engaged.

I had to put down our 14 year old cat in the middle of the night a couple of months ago and doing so ripped my guts out.

I have a 3 month old cat sitting on the other side of my shop door waiting for me to come in and play with her which makes me realize time just rolls over.

Don't feel bad for wanting another one Mr. Fax. It's good. Pets are awesome.

demonhero
12-13-2012, 07:23 PM
http://dogs.oodle.com/brittany_spaniel/olathe-ks/?oldq=brittany&inbs=1&r=250

whats that↑

BigRedChief
12-13-2012, 07:25 PM
It's too bad that dogs don't live as long as us humans.

Fax, go get yourself another furry family friend. You will be glad you did.

Goldmember
12-13-2012, 08:10 PM
I feel your pain. Not much tougher than losing a loyal friend and companion.

Goldmember
12-13-2012, 08:13 PM
I love the idea of rescuing a dog from the pound.

But I wouldn't recommend it at this point.

I got a 7-month old Catahoula in Maryville MO last summer.

He digs, he chews, he tries to bite, he hides under the porch whenever you get close...

He's mentally damaged and despite professional training and a lot of one-on-one time, he's nearly impossible to manage.

And yet there are thousands of great pets that come from pounds too.

boogblaster
12-13-2012, 08:49 PM
get another one MR FAX .. they fill the need for friendship at rough times .. they don't care if you're the president or a drifter ... my ole-buddy, booger .,. thus part of my chat name .. was a good one .. rat-terrier great little dog .. he's gone .. got a boston terrier now, he's kool too .. so get one, they worth ya time .....

chiefzilla1501
12-13-2012, 09:06 PM
I'm with you, MR. FAX. My pup passed on Tuesday night of bone cancer. There's not a spot in the house or the yard that doesn't remind me of her.

Like you, I've swore I'll never get another dog after our Brittany Spaniel passes on. She's confused as all hell too - looking around the house wondering where her friend is.

Sorry for your loss. Hope you find what you're looking for with your next pup, should you go that route.

Sorry, man. I remember you saying it was coming close. It's never easy.

HemiEd
12-14-2012, 08:09 AM
Don't get a dog from the pound.

Get one from a licensed breeder.

They're far more likely to live longer and have fewer problems.

Are you still feeding them peanut butter off of your junk?

htismaqe
12-14-2012, 08:22 AM
And yet there are thousands of great pets that come from pounds too.

I never said there weren't.

Bottom line is that getting a dog from a pound is taking a chance.

Getting a puppy gives you COMPLETE control over a dog's upbringing.

Dayze
12-14-2012, 09:53 AM
I love the idea of rescuing a dog from the pound.

But I wouldn't recommend it at this point.

I got a 7-month old Catahoula in Maryville MO last summer.

He digs, he chews, he tries to bite, he hides under the porch whenever you get close...

He's mentally damaged and despite professional training and a lot of one-on-one time, he's nearly impossible to manage.

sounds a lot like Cassel.

FAX
12-14-2012, 01:55 PM
I never said there weren't.

Bottom line is that getting a dog from a pound is taking a chance.

Getting a puppy gives you COMPLETE control over a dog's upbringing.

Oh ... I'm beginning to understand now ...

Does your rescue pound not have baby dogs? The ones around here (Brentwood and Belle Meade) have puppies ... although, sadly, not for long. I think they have either 7 or 10 days to be claimed and that's it.

FAX

AirForceChief
12-14-2012, 03:41 PM
I recall making the same "no more dogs for me" pledge the day I had to put down both of our Poms on the same day. I made it to my car before having the obligatory melt down. Missed those dogs terribly. They were excellent family. The wife and daughter began pressuring me to get a dog about two years later. I was all, "screw that, you didn't have to put them down." About two years after that, I acquiesced and we adopted two mutts from the local rescue effort. There's something about a dog that completes my home. Plus, they love hanging with me when the wife and daughter arn't so inclined. Just took me awhile to be ready to commit.

P.S. - I hate squirrels. Long live those who fight in the war against those rats with good PR (i.e., fluffy tails).