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View Full Version : Judge Frees Violent Sexual Predator


Kraut
09-15-2004, 04:23 AM
This judge should be forced to step down and if this scumbag pedophile does anything to any children then the judge should be brought up on charges. :mad:

http://www.sacbee.com/state_wire/story/10732731p-11651195c.html

Brock
09-15-2004, 11:21 AM
Unreal. When are people going to understand that perverts can't be cured?

HC_Chief
09-15-2004, 11:28 AM
That has to be one of the dumbest things I've ever heard! They lock a guy, who has been in and out of prison over the past 20 years for violent crimes involving pedophelia, in a trailer for year then simply let him roam free? WTF is wrong with that judge?!

My guess is he (the judge) doesn't have kids.

Disgusting.

mlyonsd
09-15-2004, 11:30 AM
If this guy had sexually offended one of my kids the hunter would now become the huntee.

Lightning Rod
09-15-2004, 12:04 PM
"DeVries was voluntarily castrated in August 2001, a surgery he says took away his ability for sexual arousal, though some experts doubt the effectiveness of such surgeries."


Well that should help some.

DenverChief
09-15-2004, 12:07 PM
"DeVries was voluntarily castrated in August 2001, a surgery he says took away his ability for sexual arousal, though some experts doubt the effectiveness of such surgeries."


Well that should help some.

yeah the problem being they use other methods suchs as fingers and other objects to derive their pleasure....the war on drugs should be ended so that there is more room for these AHoles

Lightning Rod
09-15-2004, 12:16 PM
yeah the problem being they use other methods suchs as fingers and other objects to derive their pleasure....the war on drugs should be ended so that there is more room for these AHoles

I agree.

do we know if this "person" served his entire sentance? Or was this some sort of early release thing?

DenverChief
09-15-2004, 12:20 PM
I agree.

do we know if this "person" served his entire sentance? Or was this some sort of early release thing?

from what I skimmed over he completed his therapy requirements and was in "good standing" with the prison offcials now all he has to do is register with the police every 90 days

DanT
09-15-2004, 12:26 PM
Atascadero's treatment program is designed for California's most serious, violent, repeat sex offenders. Those who fit the profile are sent to the mental hospital after serving their prison sentences, and can be recommitted every two years until a judge decides they're no longer a threat to society.

The above quote is from the SacBee newspaper article, whose URL is provided in the topic post.


As far as I'm concerned, the man served his time. A sentence is a sentence. May he find redemption through God.

Lightning Rod
09-15-2004, 12:27 PM
from what I skimmed over he completed his therapy requirements and was in "good standing" with the prison offcials now all he has to do is register with the police every 90 days


In that case this may be an issue with what is the Law and not that the Judge is an idiot. I agree with the connection you were making and I think even the most Anti drug people would agree with you that they would rather have the worst Pot-head on the streets if they could keep the "best?? least bad??? I can't think of a good way to put it" pedophile behind bars.

DenverChief
09-15-2004, 12:30 PM
"best?? least bad??? I can't think of a good way to put it" pedophile behind bars.

ROFL I understand what you are saying

Brock
09-15-2004, 12:32 PM
The above quote is from the SacBee newspaper article, whose URL is provided in the topic post.


As far as I'm concerned, the man served his time. A sentence is a sentence. May he find redemption through God.


And may his hand not find its way into your kid's pants.

DanT
09-15-2004, 12:36 PM
And may his hand not find its way into your kid's pants.


Yeah, I can't stand how all these big-government types want to use examples like this to get the state to reach into ours our our kids' pants to plunder our wallets and pay for sh!t that ain't anywhere in the Constitution.

Brock
09-15-2004, 12:40 PM
Yeah, I can't stand how all these big-government types want to use examples like this to get the state to reach into ours our our kids' pants to plunder our wallets and pay for sh!t that ain't anywhere in the Constitution.

Neither is requiring a sex offender to inform you that he is moving in next door, but something tells me you would want to know. Or maybe you're open-minded enough to be okay with it. Whichever.

DanT
09-15-2004, 12:44 PM
Neither is requiring a sex offender to inform you that he is moving in next door, but something tells me you would want to know. Or maybe you're open-minded enough to be okay with it. Whichever.

Those requirements were passed by legislators using a process described by the Constitution, as far as I know.

Brock
09-15-2004, 12:58 PM
Those requirements were passed by legislators using a process described by the Constitution, as far as I know.

And there is something unconstitutional about putting molesters in prison for the rest of their lives?

DanT
09-15-2004, 12:59 PM
Those requirements were passed by legislators using a process described by the Constitution, as far as I know.

It turns out that the "lock people up past when their sentences expired" policy was also passed by legislators (in California). Reading the rest of the article from which the following was extracted, one gets the idea of what's going on. Some quasi-scientific horsesh!t is used to justify a program that is exhorbitantly expensive and is based on a policy of depriving people of their liberty because they MIGHT commit a crime against someone else. Of course, there ain't any end to that road, which is why the big-government types that stand to profit from such nonsense want to use "sexual predators" as the starting block. Judging from the damage that a depraved executive class has done to the pensions of former Enron employees and others, how about we lock up people right when they get their MBA's?

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/a/2004/07/11/MNGB57ILU41.DTL


While defense lawyers say hospital confinement after prison amounts to re- punishment, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1997 that a similar law in Kansas was constitutional, as long as it was applied in a nonpunitive fashion. In 1999, the California Supreme Court upheld the state's predator law, concluding that patients are not held for past crimes but instead for their mental disorders and their propensity to commit future violent crimes.

In California, decisions to extend incarceration turn on the issue of dangerousness: whether there is a "serious and well-founded risk" the inmate will re-offend in a sexually violent manner.

"There have been considerable advances in the prediction of sex offense recidivism in the last 10 years," said R. Karl Hanson, a Canadian government researcher and a leading authority on sexual predators, but the process remains speculative. Certain rapists older than 60 are less likely to rape again. Child molesters tend to continue to offend later in their lives.

"There is no certainty in this business," Hanson said. "Some people who have had terrible histories of offending decide to stop. ... A lot of sex crime, like other crime, is impulsive."

Ted Donaldson, a psychologist in Morro Bay (San Luis Obispo County) who often testifies for the defense in sexual predator cases, said the program "has more politics and more bad psychology than any other program we've ever had. Most of the people being committed don't have a sexual mental disorder" as required under the law. "Most of them do have ugly criminal histories. Juries don't like them."

Marita Mayer, a Contra Costa County deputy public defender, compares the predator law to the 2002 film "Minority Report," in which people were imprisoned for future crimes envisioned by women with a gift for prophecy.

"I don't think anybody can predict the future. It's all kind of voodoo to me," Mayer said. "It's a pre-emptive strike against the sex offenders: to lock up these people before they do it again. We have lowered the standard so much that we are locking up people who probably won't recommit because a few of them might."

Duck Dog
09-15-2004, 01:00 PM
yeah the problem being they use other methods suchs as fingers and other objects to derive their pleasure....the war on drugs should be ended so that there is more room for these AHoles


I agree 100%.

It's too bad this guy made it through his sentence without being killed.

DanT
09-15-2004, 01:02 PM
And there is something unconstitutional about putting molesters in prison for the rest of their lives?


Not if it's done like this:

Pass a law that makes that a potential sentence.

Apply that law in cases involving events that happend after the law has been passed.

Cochise
09-15-2004, 01:03 PM
For any kind of sex crime or violent crime there should be a mandatory minimum 20 years in fed with no early release. Repeat offenders would get life with no parole. Don't like it? Stop breaking the law.

He should have never had the chance to get near the other 8 children after the first one.

mlyonsd
09-15-2004, 01:05 PM
For any kind of sex crime or violent crime there should be a mandatory 20 years in club fed with no early release. He should have never had the chance to get near the other 8 children after the first one.
20 years for a sex crime committed against a child isn't enough IMO.

DanT
09-15-2004, 01:07 PM
Here are the first two paragraphs of the sfgate.com newspaper article I quoted just now:


California, in a program whose effectiveness is being questioned, spends more than $75 million a year to lock up hundreds of child molesters and rapists in a maximum-security hospital here after their prison terms have ended.

The cost -- about $400 a day per person -- pays for housing, health care, administrative and court-related costs of 535 ex-convicts who are incarcerated at Atascadero State Hospital in the Sexually Violent Predator Program. The price tag is about five times the daily cost of keeping an inmate in state prison.

Cochise
09-15-2004, 01:08 PM
20 years for a sex crime committed against a child isn't enough IMO.

Well, I meant more like at least 20 years.

It's not that I don't think someone can change. People can change and be rehabilitated and I believe they should have that opportunity. But there should be zero tolorance beyond that one chance. The fact that any sex offender could be in and out of jail over a period of years is ridiculous.

Cochise
09-15-2004, 01:08 PM
Here are the first two paragraphs of the sfgate.com newspaper article I quoted just now:

Are you suggesting that the cost of keeping a sex offender locked up is higher to society than letting them run loose on the street?

mlyonsd
09-15-2004, 01:09 PM
Well, I meant more like at least 20 years.

It's not that I don't think someone can change. People can change and be rehabilitated and I believe they should have that opportunity. But there should be zero tolorance beyond that one chance. The fact that any sex offender could be in and out of jail over a period of years is ridiculous.

Exactly.

DanT
09-15-2004, 01:27 PM
Are you suggesting that the cost of keeping a sex offender locked up is higher to society than letting them run loose on the street?



In California, the price tag of keeping someone "locked up" in a supposedly non-punitive fashion in a state hospital is five times what it costs to keep an inmate locked up in the state prison system.

That's what I'm suggesting.

Kraut
09-15-2004, 01:56 PM
I agree.

do we know if this "person" served his entire sentance? Or was this some sort of early release thing?
It was an early release from the judge. This scumbag's Dr. warned against any kind of release but the judge didn't listen i guess. :banghead:

Kraut
09-15-2004, 02:03 PM
The sad thing is the mental health field has admitted that sexual predators can not be cured. Now I'm sure there are some out there in that field that will argue. I'm not in that field but I have a friend that is and he says that the majority, and by that I mean about 80 + % know they can not be cured but yet the CJ system will not come to realize this. I'm sorry but the victims' rights here come first without a doubt in my mind. I know it sounds harsh but for these sick and cruel sexual predators who probably will never be cured a .45 round would be the best medicine.

Of course in the US this is not a possible sollution. It's just me venting and wishing.