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View Full Version : Eric Hicks on 810 right now


ENDelt260
09-21-2004, 04:48 PM
Tune in http://www.810whb.com

ENDelt260
09-21-2004, 04:49 PM
First thing:

Keitz: "Should the Chiefs have added Defensive personell or what?"

Hicks: "Is that a joke?"

Bowser
09-21-2004, 04:49 PM
I bet Kev is nice as a fluffer compared to that mean 'ol Rhonda Moss!

ENDelt260
09-21-2004, 04:49 PM
I'm too lazy to do Iowani-style pbp... don't get your hopes up

Bowser
09-21-2004, 04:49 PM
First thing:

Keitz: "Should the Chiefs have added Defensive personell or what?"

Hicks: "Is that a joke?"

ROFL
Or not!

tk13
09-21-2004, 04:50 PM
Maybe the most spirited argument on Around the Horn today was about him... a couple guys really bashed him for that big rant that's all over TV. Mariotti of course was one of them.... That host, Stat Boy, and the writer for the LA Times (the name escapes me) both actually defended him, saying he didn't insult or abuse the reporter, and just gave an honest answer and didn't have any problem with what he did....

ENDelt260
09-21-2004, 04:53 PM
re: Warfield...

Hicks learned via media... no comment. Gee, glad I dedicated keystorkes to that.

ENDelt260
09-21-2004, 04:54 PM
hicksforhearts.com

Is there any player w/out a charitable organization?

Bowser
09-21-2004, 04:54 PM
re: Warfield...

Hicks learned via media... no comment. Gee, glad I dedicated keystorkes to that.

Doin' a hell of a job, Delt! :thumb: :D

Count Alex's Losses
09-21-2004, 04:55 PM
Hicks > Holliday

ENDelt260
09-21-2004, 04:55 PM
hicksforhearts.com

Is there any player w/out a charitable organization?
Make that .org

tk13
09-21-2004, 04:57 PM
I had no idea his daughter had all those problems....

morphius
09-21-2004, 05:02 PM
Make that .org
Its part of the contracts the Chiefs put into their deals to get them involved with the community...

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 05:07 PM
hicksforhearts.com

Is there any player w/out a charitable organization?

I know he started his cuz his daughter was born with a hole in her heart

ROYC75
09-21-2004, 05:26 PM
Hicksfordefense.org

his daughter's heart isn't the only thing with holes in it

The defense was a good take.....

The daughter part was bad ......... shame on youuuuuuuuuuuuu

ChiefsCountry
09-21-2004, 05:44 PM
Yeah the part about his daughter wasnt cool at all.

Baby Lee
09-21-2004, 05:58 PM
Maybe the most spirited argument on Around the Horn today was about him... a couple guys really bashed him for that big rant that's all over TV. Mariotti of course was one of them.... That host, Stat Boy, and the writer for the LA Times (the name escapes me) both actually defended him, saying he didn't insult or abuse the reporter, and just gave an honest answer and didn't have any problem with what he did....
It was a great response, too bad it came from such a nudnick.

Coach
09-21-2004, 07:26 PM
I had no idea his daughter had all those problems....

Yeah, I think in my mind that's one of the reason why he struggled, despite in a G-Rob crappy scheme, that his father passed away at the same time where his daughter was having problems. He was trying to play through both types of pain.

Hopefully he'll pick it up soon. This year is no excuse though. JMHO.

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 07:36 PM
his daughter's heart isn't the only thing with holes in it

dude not cool






:shake:

Stinger
09-21-2004, 07:42 PM
Hicksfordefense.org

his daughter's heart isn't the only thing with holes in it

Yeah the part about his daughter wasnt cool at all.

dude not cool

No it is not cool that he said it, but in his defense I guarentee that he was not the only one to think it.

|Zach|
09-21-2004, 07:48 PM
No reaosn for that post.

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 08:05 PM
No it is not cool that he said it, but in his defense I guarentee that he was not the only one to think it.


Defend all you want, that is your choice.

Making fun of a ball player is one story, making a snide comment about his daughter who was born with a heart defect is not.

If you thought my mind would conjure that up then you are oh so wrong.

Coach
09-21-2004, 08:05 PM
For those you didn't go to the link, this one is pretty touching. It's long, but it's worth it.

A story about heart
As his child fought for her life, Hicks was becoming an elite player
By Ron Pollack, Editor-in-chief
As published in print Feb. 12, 2001

Eric Hicks heard the screams.

These were not the type of screams Hicks, a defensive lineman for the Chiefs, was used to hearing on the football field. They were not the screams of a teammate exulting after a sack. They were not the screams of a player who had just blown out his knee.

These were the screams of Hicks’ wife, Erica. Their 7-day-old daughter, Shayla, was in cardiac arrest at an Ozark, Mo., hospital. Hicks and his wife could only watch helplessly, nervously, frantically.

"It was the scariest thing I had ever gone through in my life," Hicks says. "I was a parent for the first time. Only a 7-day-old parent myself. And I just kept thinking, ‘My little girl is going to die.’ Of course, we didn’t know what was wrong with her at that point. So we were scared out of (our) mind. My wife was screaming. I was trying to be strong, but it was kind of hard."

How could this be happening?

Hicks looked at his tiny child, fearing the worst. Her heart was failing. His heart was breaking.

The hospital staff revived Shayla and worked on her for two hours. Then Shayla was flown to a hospital in Kansas City, while Hicks and his wife drove for two-and-a-half hours to meet her there. It had to seem like two-and-a-half days.

"It was bad, but it wasn’t as bad as it could have been," Hicks says. "They called us from the helicopter while they were in the air to keep us updated."

As the helicopter arrived at the Kansas City hospital, little Shayla almost died again. Somehow she survived.

The doctors fixed the aorta that was blocked near her heart, and she temporarily seemed fine as her father headed off to his second NFL training camp in 1999.

Then Shayla started having problems eating, so a pediatrician recommended that tests be taken. It turned out that her heart was like a piece of Swiss cheese. Holes everywhere.

Everything was happening so fast for Hicks. John Browning, who was a starting defensive end for the Chiefs, suffered a season-ending Achilles injury. The DLE job was up in the air. Opportunity was knocking for Hicks. That day, Hicks got a call from his wife, who told him the latest bad news about Shayla. A parent’s worst nightmare was knocking for Hicks. Which knock should he answer? Which door should he open? What should he do?

How could this be happening?

Hicks thought about his tiny child and tried to decide what to do. Her heart was failing. His heart was breaking.

"I didn’t know whether to go home or stay there and just keep on playing," Hicks says.

Should he leave training camp to offer moral support, or should he stay and fight for a starting job that could provide the financial support that Shayla’s medical condition was going to require?

There were no flights for Hicks to take that night as he pondered what to do.

Finally, then-head coach Gunther Cunningham came to Hicks and said, "Hey, we got you a flight home in the morning."

Hicks said, "I don’t know."

Then Cunningham said something marvelous: "If you don’t go home, I’m going to cut you. So you will go."

The Chiefs’ organization told Hicks that he would get the starting job if he earned it when he returned to training camp. Hicks went home for two days to be with his family.

The day Hicks arrived, doctors performed a pulmonary banding procedure to restrict blood flow and keep it from going into Shayla’s lungs, which was the source of her latest problem.

"She probably would have died within a month if not for that banding," Hicks says.

The procedure offered a temporary solution, not a cure. The banding was designed to buy time until the holes would close on their own as Shayla got older.

As Hicks fought for a starting job with the Chiefs, Shayla’s woes continued the rest of the summer and through that October.

The lowest moment for Hicks came that August, just prior to what should have been a happy moment. It was the night before he would get his first pro start in a preseason game.

"It seemed like nothing was ever going to go right, and it just seemed like she wasn’t going to make it too many more days," Hicks says. "She just looked like she wasn’t going to make it, and they had to call a whole bunch of doctors in. It was just a scary moment."

Shayla survived that night. It was part of what was becoming an all-too-familiar pattern of Shayla dodging death but not being able to declare the battle won.

More times than he cares to remember, Hicks would go to the hospital after practice and see that Shayla’s oxygen level had dropped to life-threatening levels.

"Sometimes I would get to the hospital at 5 o’clock after working all day, and people would be running out of the room, and they’d be calling ‘code blue,’ " Hicks says.

Shayla kept hanging on for dear life. Not every child is so fortunate. Hicks, being a Chiefs player, was a celebrity to the kids in the hospital in which Shayla was being treated. When he wasn’t with Shayla, Hicks would visit these other sick children.

"Then the next day, I would go back to the hospital, and the room would be empty," Hicks says. "And I’d ask, ‘Did they go home? They were pretty sick yesterday.’ And they’d be like, ‘No, they died.’

"It was really sad. We’ve developed relationships with people there that we’ve actually gone to their funerals, their children’s funerals that died, the children that died while Shayla was there."

Shayla, one tough little cookie, was still fighting for her life. There was talk of the possibility of a heart transplant, but that was not an ideal solution.

"She wouldn’t have lived probably past 5 years old," Hicks says. "So we were really hoping that they could just, by the grace of God, fix everything."

A father worried about the worst and prayed for the best for his daughter. Her heart was failing. His heart was breaking.

And then, finally, a burst of sunshine. In October of that year, a test showed that, miraculously, all but one of the holes in Shayla’s heart had healed. The third open-heart surgery of Shayla’s young life fixed that last hole. Problem solved. These days, Shayla is completely out of harm’s way.

"Shayla is perfect," Hicks says as he holds her. "She’s never going to have a problem, they say. She just has to get stress tests before she does sports when she’s older.

"She’s really tall. I think she’s going to be a basketball player, personally. I obviously will let her do anything she wants. She’s just a miracle. She can do nothing if she wanted, but I think she’s going to be a real go-getter, just an active type. I can’t wait until she has kids so she can tell them a story of what happened to her."

Don’t be surprised if Shayla tells her kids a story about her dad as well. It is quite a tale. Remember how the Chiefs told Hicks he could win the starting job when he returned to training camp from Shayla’s hospital bedside if he earned it? Well, guess what? Hicks did just that.

A year earlier, he had not even been drafted, yet he made the team. Then, during Shayla’s health trials and tribulations, he somehow maintained the focus to win the starting job left open by Browning’s injury.

"I think it was easier for me to focus because I knew I needed to work and have good medical insurance because her hospital bills ended up being … now it’s around like a million dollars," Hicks says. "Football actually gave me a little bit of relief. The hitting and everything in practice just let me get out a little bit of my aggression because I couldn’t obviously do it at the hospital."

Hicks started all 16 games during the ’99 season. In the Chiefs’ 13th game, he returned a fumble 44 yards for a touchdown to break a 21-21 tie in Kansas City’s 31-28 win over the Vikings. Hicks got home a little bit after midnight from the game. The first thing he did was go to Shayla’s room and put the football from his touchdown in her crib. It still sits there to this day.

The best was yet to come, although, as seems to be a recurring theme, not without an unwanted detour.

Hicks, who had only four sacks in ’99, got off to a blazing start in 2000, posting seven sacks in the first seven games. In that seventh game, however, disaster struck. He tore the medial collateral ligament in his knee.

"I can remember sitting on the field, saying, ‘Why now?’ " Hicks says. "I usually am not big on questioning God about things, and I didn’t do it that day, but I just was (thinking), ‘This really stinks.’ "

Hicks returned to action after missing three games, yet still managed to finish the season with a whopping 14 sacks, the third-highest total in the AFC in 2000.

Not bad for an undersized defensive end who was not drafted and made himself into a player by drinking a gallon of milk a day during his first NFL offseason, thus adding a much-needed 25 pounds to his frame. Not bad for someone who had every excuse in the world to lose focus as a player during his daughter’s health woes but instead fought for his family, his team, his future.

This offseason, for the first time since he turned pro, everything is great for Hicks. No longer is he a long shot to make the team. No longer does he have to fight to be a starter. No longer does he have to wonder if he is capable of becoming a big-time player. And most importantly, no longer does he have to worry about Shayla’s health.

He and his wife just bought a new house. A vacation to the Bahamas was on the offseason agenda.

"We pretty much don’t have any worries now," Hicks says.

Anxiety is only found in the rear-view mirror these days, so it’s full-speed ahead.

"Now I’m just going to try to honor my daughter as much as I can and try to make the Pro Bowl, All-Pro, things like that, and try to go down as one of the best pass rushers in Chiefs, if not NFL, history," Hicks says.

His foot is still on the accelerator in terms of these professional goals, yet there is also a sense that Hicks can finally relax, finally breathe comfortably, finally stop and smell the roses.

"Everybody is healthy, and it’s just a lot of fun," Hicks says.

The only screaming going on in the Hicks family these days is the healthy crying of young Shayla. Oh, yes, and the desire of her father to scream for joy.

Her heart is working. His heart is swelling with pride.

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 08:08 PM
Eh coach.....



rep for finding it

:)

Stinger
09-21-2004, 08:10 PM
Defend all you want, that is your choice.

Making fun of a ball player is one story, making a snide comment about his daughter who was born with a heart defect is not.

If you thought my mind would conjure that up then you are oh so wrong.
I am not saying you did, but with so many smart @sses, including myself, we tend not to think before we type, which is WRONG. Trying to make the first funny remark on a thread.

I said it was in bad taste and am not defending that he said it. I am saying he should have not said it out loud.

Demonpenz
09-21-2004, 08:12 PM
I will take it back, should have thought before posting it, it wasn't funny, but neither is losing.

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 08:24 PM
I am not saying you did, but with so many smart @sses, including myself, we tend not to think before we type, which is WRONG. Trying to make the first funny remark on a thread.

I said it was in bad taste and am not defending that he said it. I am saying he should have not said it out loud.

I don't care if he said it out loud, just don't type it...

I hear ya........................................






:thumb:

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 08:26 PM
I will take it back, should have thought before posting it, it wasn't funny, but neither is losing.


It's all good, I just remember reading that story when it came out.

It was right after my daughter was born and I was just thanking god that didn't happen to her.

TheNextStep
09-21-2004, 09:37 PM
Finally, then-head coach Gunther Cunningham came to Hicks and said, "Hey, we got you a flight home in the morning."

Hicks said, "I don’t know."

Then Cunningham said something marvelous: "If you don’t go home, I’m going to cut you. So you will go."


Props to Gunther for that one.

KHinz57
09-21-2004, 10:03 PM
So what the hell? Does this mean we forgive Eric Hicks for sucking? We now have to overlook his lack of ability on defense, and forget when DeJuan Foster bounced off him and ran right by while Eric Hicks was befuddled on what to do with the guy with the ball right in front of him.

Sure-Oz
09-21-2004, 10:03 PM
I think Gun needs to be on the sidelines rather then the booth to direct this defense, he can bitch them out real good in person right after the play.

Count Alex's Losses
09-21-2004, 10:05 PM
I think Gun needs to be on the sidelines rather then the booth to direct this defense, he can bitch them out real good in person right after the play.

Uh, no. Knobinson was a sideline roamer and it did little good. DV said you can more accurately evaluate and plan for later in the game from up in the booth.

Sure-Oz
09-21-2004, 10:16 PM
DV don't know DICK about defense.

milkman
09-21-2004, 11:12 PM
So what the hell? Does this mean we forgive Eric Hicks for sucking? We now have to overlook his lack of ability on defense, and forget when DeJuan Foster bounced off him and ran right by while Eric Hicks was befuddled on what to do with the guy with the ball right in front of him.

No this doesn't mean we forgive him for sucking.

He's got character, no question.
He just hasn't had any game.

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 11:14 PM
Uh, no. Knobinson was a sideline roamer and it did little good. DV said you can more accurately evaluate and plan for later in the game from up in the booth.

Gun was in the booth during the glory years. I don't think he would change.

milkman
09-21-2004, 11:16 PM
Gun was in the booth during the glory years. I don't think he would change.

I didn't know Gun was in KC during the late 60s/early 70s.

J Diddy
09-21-2004, 11:25 PM
I didn't know Gun was in KC during the late 60s/early 70s.
Obviously I was talking about when Gun was here prior.

You remember when we had a defense and no offense.

Think back to the days of the 3rd and 10 fullback dive.

milkman
09-21-2004, 11:36 PM
Obviously I was talking about when Gun was here prior.

You remember when we had a defense and no offense.

Think back to the days of the 3rd and 10 fullback dive.

I knew what you were talking about.
But the only glory years were the SB years under Stram.

The 90s were the Martyocre years.
Wasn't nuthin' glorious about 'em

Rausch
09-21-2004, 11:40 PM
So what the hell? Does this mean we forgive Eric Hicks for sucking? We now have to overlook his lack of ability on defense, and forget when DeJuan Foster bounced off him and ran right by while Eric Hicks was befuddled on what to do with the guy with the ball right in front of him.

No.

It means you should decide not to be a douchebag and dog on his daughter's illness instead of his lack of production.

Hicks has sucked festering $#it so far. The rest of his family is not in the public eye, not asking to be, and beyond low to bash...

TheNextStep
09-22-2004, 01:50 AM
Besides, that DeJuan Foster, boy... he's a hell of a running back. Yep, good old DeJuan... or "Juanito" as we call him. He's way better than that little f***er that came out of UCLA.

Bob Dole
09-22-2004, 07:16 AM
He's going to be on Mike and Mike in about 90 seconds.

Bob Dole
09-22-2004, 07:23 AM
Mike and Mike support both the question and the answer.

Hicks position is that the question was disrespectful to his teammates.

Hicks: I expect to have a good working relationship with Rhonda in the future. "I hope it's all over with to tell you the truth."

Hicks: "I think we're on the right track. We're struggling, but we're learning a new language."

Hicks: "The problem right now is the big play." (Duh.)

Repeating the tackles-behind-the-line stats, etc...

Mike: Any other fallout since the interview?

Hicks: "No there hasn't. I'm going in to work right now."

Not really anything new.

Mile High Mania
09-22-2004, 07:39 AM
Considering the timing ... I think it was an idiotic question and Hicks was well within his right to go off like that. That's just one of those loaded questions that you don't ask.

chief52
09-22-2004, 07:41 AM
Considering the timing ... I think it was an idiotic question and Hicks was well within his right to go off like that. That's just one of those loaded questions that you don't ask.

True...and if you do ask an idiotic quiestion like that, you had better be prepared for the answer.