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-   -   Food and Drink Cast Iron Skillets. You dig them? (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=252301)

Fritz88 11-08-2011 11:54 AM

Cast Iron Skillets. You dig them?
 
http://538357.cache1.evolutionhostin...easoning-3.png

What's the best way to cook a burger at home, on a gas stove?

I heard that Cast Iron Skillets are the way to go.

Would you agree? Have you tried burgers on them?

Bob Dole 11-08-2011 11:54 AM

They are awesome when your (ex)wife doesn't insist on filling them with soapy water and leaving them to soak overnight...

durtyrute 11-08-2011 11:57 AM

Hell to the mutha****in yea. I love em.

NewChief 11-08-2011 11:58 AM

Calling Fire Me Boy! (at least I think it's FMB who has a serious cast iron obsession and is something of an expert).

Fried Meat Ball! 11-08-2011 11:58 AM

**** YEAH!!!!

Fried Meat Ball! 11-08-2011 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Dole (Post 8092037)
They are awesome when your (ex)wife doesn't insist on filling them with soapy water and leaving them to soak overnight...

She's your ex because you killed her, right?

Fritz88 11-08-2011 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fire Me Boy! (Post 8092048)
**** YEAH!!!!

Any brand in particular? Any tips on making burgers on them?

Do I go for the cast iron griddles or just regular ones?

Fried Meat Ball! 11-08-2011 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fritz88 (Post 8092034)
http://538357.cache1.evolutionhostin...easoning-3.png

What's the best way to cook a burger at home, on a gas stove?

I heard that Cast Iron Skillets are the way to go.

Would you agree? Have you tried burgers on them?

It's tough to beat a burger made on cast iron. I rarely do burgers on anything else.

Saul Good 11-08-2011 12:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fritz88 (Post 8092034)
http://538357.cache1.evolutionhostin...easoning-3.png

What's the best way to cook a burger at home, on a gas stove?

I heard that Cast Iron Skillets are the way to go.

Would you agree? Have you tried burgers on them?

I bought one a couple weeks ago. They are amazing for cooking a strip. Put in in the oven and preheat the oven to 500 degrees. When it's done, turn on a burner to high. Put the skillet on the burner and put the steak on for 30 seconds then flip and cook the other side for 30 seconds. Put it back in the oven for 3 minutes, flip, and 3 more minutes. Perfect steak.

Don't use soap when you clean it, though. Scrub it under hot water, dry it, and rub a little olive or vegetable oil on it before putting it away.

Bob Dole 11-08-2011 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Groupon (Post 8092063)
Don't use soap when you clean it, though. Scrub it under hot water, dry it on a stove burner, and rub a little olive or vegetable oil on it before putting it away.

:)

Fried Meat Ball! 11-08-2011 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fritz88 (Post 8092055)
Any brand in particular? Any tips on making burgers on them?

Do I go for the cast iron griddles or just regular ones?

Not really. Le Creuset are the top of the line, but I've never seen or heard anyone who owns 'em say they were worth the extra money you spend. Most of my cast iron is Lodge.

Personally, I'd skip the griddle and go with a 10- or 12-inch skillet. Everything tastes better in cast iron, and you'll limit what you can do with just a griddle.

DJ's left nut 11-08-2011 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Groupon (Post 8092063)
I bought one a couple weeks ago. They are amazing for cooking a strip. Put in in the oven and preheat the oven to 500 degrees. When it's done, turn on a burner to high. Put the skillet on the burner and put the steak on for 30 seconds then flip and cook the other side for 30 seconds. Put it back in the oven for 3 minutes, flip, and 3 more minutes. Perfect steak.

Don't use soap when you clean it, though. Scrub it under hot water, dry it, and rub a little olive or vegetable oil on it before putting it away.

Sounds like you either A) Watched a very old episode of Good Eats or B) Purchased Alton Brown's cookbook.

That's a verbatim description of how he cooks his steaks indoors.

It's a passable winter substitute for wood-charcoal in a Weber grill...

DJ's left nut 11-08-2011 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fire Me Boy! (Post 8092071)
Not really. Le Creuset are the top of the line, but I've never seen or heard anyone who owns 'em say they were worth the extra money you spend. Most of my cast iron is Lodge.

Personally, I'd skip the griddle and go with a 10- or 12-inch skillet. Everything tastes better in cast iron, and you'll limit what you can do with just a griddle.

I have a Le Crueset set that my wife won in a baking contest. It's pretty nice, but nowhere near worth the money they ask for them.

I use my Cabellas Dutch Oven more than I use any of her stuff and it works great. Otherwise I just use my cheapie Lodge skillet and have never had a complaint.

Spending a bunch of money on Cast Iron cookware is dumb - it's strength is in its simplicity. That's like spending $100 on a flathead screwdriver because it has ivory inlays in the handle or something.

Fried Meat Ball! 11-08-2011 12:07 PM

For seasoning, I still haven't done this, but according to Cook's Illustrated, this is the ultimate way to season a cast iron pan. It'll take some time, but you'll be rewarded.

From a recent edition of Cooks Illustrated (please pardon any typos - I had to re-type it from the magazine):

Quote:

For years we've seasoned cast iron cookware in the test kitchen by placing it over medium heat and wiping out the pan with coats of vegetable oil until its surface turns dark and shiny. When a pan starts to look patchy, we simply repeat the process. But when we heard about a new method that creates a slick surface so indestructible that touch-ups are almost never necessary, we were intrigued. Developed by blogger Sheryl Canter, the approach calls for treating the pan with multiple coats of flaxseed oil between hour-long stints in the oven.

We carried out Canter's approach on new, unseasoned cast iron skillets and compared them with pans treated with vegetable oil - and the results amazed us. The flaxseed oil so effectively bonded to the skillets, forming a sheer, stick-resistant veneer, that even a run through our commercial dishwasher with a squirt of degreaser left them totally unscathed. But the vegetable oil-treated skillets showed rusty spots and patchiness when they emerged from the dishwasher, requiring reseasoning before use.

Why did the new treatment work so well? Flaxseed oil is the food-grade equivalent of linseed oil, used by artists to give their paintings a hard, polished finish, and it boasts six times the amount of omega-3 fatty acids as vegetable oil. Over prolonged exposure to high heat, these fatty acids combine to form a strong, solid matrix that polymerizes to the pan's surface.

Although lengthy, seasoning with flaxseed oil is a mainly hands-off undertaking. We highly recommend the treatment:

1. Warm an unseasoned pan (either new or stripped of seasoning*) for 15 minutes in a 200-degree oven to open its pores.

2. Remove the pan from the oven. Place 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil in the pan and, using tongs, rub the oil into the surface with paper towels. With fresh paper towels, thoroughly wipe out the pan to remove excess oil.

3. Place the oiled pan upside down in a cold oven, then set the oven to its maximum baking temperature. Once the oven reaches its maximum temperature, heat the pan for one hour. Turn off the oven; cool the pan in the oven for at least two hours.

4. Repeat the process five more times or until the pan develops a dark, semi-matte surface.

*To strip a cast iron pan of seasoning, spray it with oven cleaner, wait 30 minutes, wash with soapy water, and thoroughly wipe with paper towels.

Fritz88 11-08-2011 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fire Me Boy! (Post 8092071)
Not really. Le Creuset are the top of the line, but I've never seen or heard anyone who owns 'em say they were worth the extra money you spend. Most of my cast iron is Lodge.

Personally, I'd skip the griddle and go with a 10- or 12-inch skillet. Everything tastes better in cast iron, and you'll limit what you can do with just a griddle.

Sounds good. Do I get preseasoned or season it myself?

Can't wait to get my hands on one.


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