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-   -   Nat'l Security Russian bombers penetrated U.S. airspace at least 16 times in past 10 days (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=285534)

Donger 08-07-2014 11:05 AM

Russian bombers penetrated U.S. airspace at least 16 times in past 10 days
 
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...e-least-16-ti/

Russian strategic nuclear bombers conducted at least 16 incursions into northwestern U.S. air defense identification zones over the past 10 days, an unusually sharp increase in aerial penetrations, according to U.S. defense officials.

The numerous flight encounters by Tu-95 Russian Bear H bombers prompted the scrambling of U.S. jet fighters on several occasions, and come amid heightened U.S.-Russia tensions over Ukraine. Also, during one bomber incursion near Alaska, a Russian intelligence-gathering jet was detected along with the bombers.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...#ixzz39iskz95s
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Detoxing 08-07-2014 11:07 AM

......And why weren't they shotdown....?

Taco John 08-07-2014 11:07 AM

The reset worked.

Easy 6 08-07-2014 11:08 AM

That mfer needs dealt with.

Donger 08-07-2014 11:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Detoxing (Post 10799581)
......And why weren't they shotdown....?

Because we aren't at war with Russia.

Donger 08-07-2014 11:10 AM

It is interesting, though.

Our Rivet Joint was in international airspace and they painted it with targeting radar. Basically, they "locked on" to it for a missile shot.

These Bears penetrated our airspace. I wonder if our guys did the same?

I wonder if the Russians even knew that our fighters were there until visual.

Detoxing 08-07-2014 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donger (Post 10799584)
Because we aren't at war with Russia.

So that makes it ok to enter our Air Space with bombers?

Donger 08-07-2014 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Detoxing (Post 10799590)
So that makes it ok to enter our Air Space with bombers?

No, it doesn't. But it doesn't automatically justify hostilities, either. This is just Cold War II fun (hopefully).

listopencil 08-07-2014 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donger (Post 10799577)

Russian strategic nuclear bombers conducted at least 16 incursions into northwestern U.S. air defense identification zones over the past 10 days...


An Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) is airspace over land or water in which the identification, location, and control of civil aircraft is required in the interest of national security.<sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-0" class="reference">[1]</sup> They extend beyond a country's airspace to give the country more time to respond to foreign and possibly hostile aircraft.<sup id="cite_ref-WSJNov13_2-0" class="reference">[2]</sup> The authority to establish an ADIZ is not given by any international treaty nor prohibited by international law and is not regulated by any international body.<sup id="cite_ref-WSJNov13_2-1" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-GlobSec_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-GlobSec_3-0" class="reference">
</sup>
The first ADIZ was established by the United States soon after World War II. Following the incident of September 11, 2001 (September 11 attacks) when civilian commercial aircraft was abused for mass destruction, ADIZ became prominent as a method to prepare or control a foreign aircraft from entering their territory. About 20 countries and regions now have such zones including Canada, India,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup> Japan, Pakistan, Norway and the United Kingdom, People's Republic of China, South Korea, Taiwan, United States, Sweden, Iceland and more. Russia and North Korea have unofficial ADIZ for themselves as well. <sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-WSJNov13_2-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-NYTNov27_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup> Usually such zones only cover undisputed territory, do not apply to foreign aircraft not intending to enter territorial airspace, and do not overlap.<sup id="cite_ref-GlobSec_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-nytimes.com_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup>

The United States maintains four zones: The Contiguous US ADIZ; Alaska ADIZ; Guam ADIZ; and Hawaii ADIZ.<sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-3" class="reference">[1]</sup> Under U.S. law and policy, the zone applies only to commercial aircraft intending to enter U.S. airspace.<sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup> An air defense command and control structure was developed in 1950, creating five Air Defense Identification Zones around North America. If radio interrogation failed to identify an aircraft in the ADIZ, the Air Force launched interceptor aircraft to identify the intruder visually. The air defense system reached its peak in 1962, however with the deployment of the SS-6 ICBM in the USSR, strategic threats shifted overwhelmingly to ICBM attacks, and bomber intrusions were considered to be less of a threat. It does apply to aircraft passing through the zone to other countries.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Def...ification_Zone

Donger 08-07-2014 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by listopencil (Post 10799595)
An Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) is airspace over land or water in which the identification, location, and control of civil aircraft is required in the interest of national security.<sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-0" class="reference">[1]</sup> They extend beyond a country's airspace to give the country more time to respond to foreign and possibly hostile aircraft.<sup id="cite_ref-WSJNov13_2-0" class="reference">[2]</sup> The authority to establish an ADIZ is not given by any international treaty nor prohibited by international law and is not regulated by any international body.<sup id="cite_ref-WSJNov13_2-1" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-GlobSec_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-GlobSec_3-0" class="reference">
</sup>
The first ADIZ was established by the United States soon after World War II. Following the incident of September 11, 2001 (September 11 attacks) when civilian commercial aircraft was abused for mass destruction, ADIZ became prominent as a method to prepare or control a foreign aircraft from entering their territory. About 20 countries and regions now have such zones including Canada, India,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup> Japan, Pakistan, Norway and the United Kingdom, People's Republic of China, South Korea, Taiwan, United States, Sweden, Iceland and more. Russia and North Korea have unofficial ADIZ for themselves as well. <sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-WSJNov13_2-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-NYTNov27_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup> Usually such zones only cover undisputed territory, do not apply to foreign aircraft not intending to enter territorial airspace, and do not overlap.<sup id="cite_ref-GlobSec_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-nytimes.com_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup>

The United States maintains four zones: The Contiguous US ADIZ; Alaska ADIZ; Guam ADIZ; and Hawaii ADIZ.<sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-3" class="reference">[1]</sup> Under U.S. law and policy, the zone applies only to commercial aircraft intending to enter U.S. airspace.<sup id="cite_ref-Abeyratne_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup> An air defense command and control structure was developed in 1950, creating five Air Defense Identification Zones around North America. If radio interrogation failed to identify an aircraft in the ADIZ, the Air Force launched interceptor aircraft to identify the intruder visually. The air defense system reached its peak in 1962, however with the deployment of the SS-6 ICBM in the USSR, strategic threats shifted overwhelmingly to ICBM attacks, and bomber intrusions were considered to be less of a threat. It does apply to aircraft passing through the zone to other countries.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Def...ification_Zone

Yep.

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...adiz-jan09.pdf

Fish 08-07-2014 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donger (Post 10799588)
It is interesting, though.

Our Rivet Joint was in international airspace and they painted it with targeting radar. Basically, they "locked on" to it for a missile shot.

These Bears penetrated our airspace. I wonder if our guys did the same?

I wonder if the Russians even knew that our fighters were there until visual.

Of course we did..

Donger 08-07-2014 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fish (Post 10799625)
Of course we did..

Actually, I seriously doubt they did. We most likely intercepted with F-22s.

Detoxing 08-07-2014 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donger (Post 10799632)
Actually, I seriously doubt they did. We most likely intercepted with F-22s.

How long does it take to get an F22 off the ground and behind a russian bomber? I've always wondered how quickly that occurs.

loochy 08-07-2014 11:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Detoxing (Post 10799689)
How long does it take to get an F22 off the ground and behind a russian bomber? I've always wondered how quickly that occurs.

I belive they have a certain number of aricraft up on patrol at any given time

also, i believe they always have a few aircraft and pilots designated and ready for scramble so they can be up in just a couple of minutes

Donger 08-07-2014 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Detoxing (Post 10799689)
How long does it take to get an F22 off the ground and behind a russian bomber? I've always wondered how quickly that occurs.

Kinda depends on the distances! :D

The article says that our jets scrambled, so these were likely ready aircraft. Figure they were airborne and heading toward the bogeys in a few minutes. With super-cruise on.


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