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Old 07-11-2013, 06:17 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Hamas' Jenkins View Post
Of the 4,086 applicants who scheduled drug tests while the law was enforced, 108 people, or 2.6 percent, failed, most often testing positive for marijuana. About 40 people scheduled tests but canceled them, according to the Department of Children and Families, which oversees Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, known as the TANF program.

The numbers, confirming previous estimates, show that taxpayers spent $118,140 to reimburse people for drug test costs, at an average of $35 per screening.

The stateís net loss? $45,780.

"Thatís not counting attorneys and court fees and the thousands of hours of staff time it took to implement this policy," Newton said.
The law also didnít impact the number of people who applied for benefits.

The findings donít ruffle supporters of the law, who say that its primary purpose is to make sure taxpayer money doesnít supplement drug use.


http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/04/2...ests-cost.html

Needs Repeating.

More information about why everything about this Policy is based off of lies.
Quote:
Drug testing proponents like to argue that there are large numbers of drug users going on welfare to get money to support their habits. The claim feeds into long-standing stereotypes about the kind of people who go on welfare, but it does not appear to have much basis in fact.

Several studies, including a 1996 report from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, have found that there is no significant difference in the rate of illegal-drug use by welfare applicants and other people. Another study found that 70% of illegal-drug users between the age of 18 and 49 are employed full time.

Drug-testing laws are often touted as a way of saving tax dollars, but the facts are once again not quite as presented. Idaho recently commissioned a study of the likely financial impact of drug testing its welfare applicants. The study found that the costs were likely to exceed any money saved.
and

Quote:
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, writing for the majority, said that the drug testing was an unreasonable search. The state can impose drug tests in exceptional cases, when there is a public-safety need for them (as with bus and train operators, for instance). But the Fourth Amendment does not allow the state to diminish ďpersonal privacy for a symbolís sake,Ē the court said.
Read more: http://ideas.time.com/2011/08/29/dru...#ixzz2YjrHqWKd
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