Home Mail MemberMap Chat (0) Wallpapers
Go Back   ChiefsPlanet > The Royal Lounge > D.C.

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Prev Previous Post   Next Post Next
Old 01-31-2013, 06:21 AM   Topic Starter
Direckshun Direckshun is offline
Black for Palestine
 
Direckshun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Springpatch
Casino cash: $8971
Why haven't oil prices dropped like a rock?

So I admit I know very little when it comes to this subject. But weren't we told "drill baby drill" going back as far as the 2008 GOP convention, and that an oil surge from something like the Keystone Pipeline would drop gas prices down to something ridiculous like $2/gallon?

I never believed that rosy scenerio, but we've gotten the most promising news in energy independence this past year when it has now been projected for America to overtake Saudi Arabia in oil production.

So here we are, projected to be the global leader in oil production. Something that not even the Keystone Pipeline could have achieved, and goes beyond even its rosy projections in terms of oil generated for American usage.

Oil prices have largely held, have they not? My understanding (limited as it is) is that oil is priced based on the projection of how much we'll be able to acquire in the future:

Quote:
There are many factors that commodities traders look at when developing the bids that create oil prices:
  • Current supply in terms of output, especially the production quota set by OPEC. If traders believe supply will decline, they bid the price up. If they believe supply will increase, they willing to pay as much for oil, and the price falls.
  • Oil reserves, including what is available in U.S. refineries and what is stored at the Strategic Petroleum Reserves. These reserves can be accessed very easily, and can add to the oil supply if prices get too high. Saudi Arabia also has a large reserve capacity. If it promises to tap those reserves, traders allow oil prices to fall.
  • Oil demand, particularly from the U.S. These estimates are provided monthly by the Energy Information Agency . Demand usually rises during the summer vacation driving season. To predict summer-time demand, forecasts for travel from AAA are used to determine potential gasoline use. During the winter, weather forecasts are used to determine potential home heating oil use.
Our current supply is increasing, our reserves are or will be increasing.

So what's the story on this?

Thanks in advance.
Posts: 44,465
Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.Direckshun is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
 

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:38 AM.


This is a test for a client's site.
A new website that shows member-created construction site listings that need fill or have excess fill. Dirt Monkey @ https://DirtMonkey.net
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.