Home Mail MemberMap Chat (0) Wallpapers
Go Back   ChiefsPlanet > The Lounge

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-11-2006, 10:37 PM  
big nasty kcnut big nasty kcnut is offline
Hey wanna fight!
 
big nasty kcnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: wichita kansas u.s.a.
Casino cash: $8242
Ok for the high brow crowd what books you are reading

I'm reading The New American Revolution by tammy bruce. She is a great thinker and funny.
Posts: 12,713
big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.big nasty kcnut has an IQ even higher than Frankie's.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 10:50 PM   #421
blaise blaise is offline
Gonzo = Sexy Bitch
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Plano, TX
Casino cash: $480
I've also recently been reading plays- I realize some people don't really enjoy that, but for some pieces the chances of you actually ever seeing it produced are slim.
Woyzeck, by Georg Buchner is outstanding, as is Six Characters in Search of an Author, by Luigi Pirandello.

Two of my favorite novels are baseball themed books: You Know Me Al, by Ring Lardner is hilarious, and The Southpaw, By Mark Harris is a great baseball book. If you're a baseball fan, and haven't read those you should definitely check them out.
Posts: 21,104
blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.blaise is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 11:41 PM   #422
BigOlChiefsfan BigOlChiefsfan is offline
Certified Bourbon taster
 
BigOlChiefsfan's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2000
Casino cash: $6652
Working on a couple self help books about diabetes and heart disease as well as Gene Wolfe's latest "Pirate Freedom".
__________________
A man can never own too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition. -- R. Kipling
Posts: 4,407
BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.BigOlChiefsfan is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 11:44 PM   #423
irishjayhawk irishjayhawk is offline
Feelin' Alright
 
irishjayhawk's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2004
Casino cash: $5000
I just read I Am Legend. Great book, loved it and the reshoots their doing for the movie I hope don't impact the fitting ending, which apparently is by the book.

I am now into The Golden Compass. Liking it thus far.
Posts: 16,887
irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.irishjayhawk is a favorite in the douche of the year contest.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 08:52 AM   #424
Jilly Jilly is offline
MVP
 
Jilly's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Independence
Casino cash: $5025
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewPhin
I absolutely love her. It's one of the few places where my and my wife's literary tastes intersect. The Poisonwood Bible definitely appeals to my ambitious fiction tastes in that's it's a BIG work with lots of ideas and lots of nerve driving it. That being said, I think the Prodigal Summer is probably my favorite work of hers. It just spoke to me like crazy.

My wife finished her memoir about eating locally a while back, but I haven't picked it up yet.
Oddly enough she also writes for an environmental magazine about organic growing.... I need to pick up prodigal summer, I haven't read that one yet.
__________________
"In most of our human relationships, we spend much of our time reassuring one another that our costumes of identity are on straight."
— Ram Dass
Posts: 8,422
Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.Jilly would the whole thing.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 09:22 AM   #425
mlyonsd mlyonsd is offline
Supporter
 

Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Spink, SD
Casino cash: $10800
I just got done with Bob Dole's biography, One Soldier's Story.

He's quite a guy. For some reason I thought he had a prosthetic arm but that isn't the case. The nerves were damaged from a shell burst in Italy, to the point the arm is practically useless, although he can move it some.

The book was pretty dry though, his sense of humor is just about as lame in writing, much like it is here on CP.
Posts: 25,462
mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.mlyonsd is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 10:34 AM   #426
Easy 6 Easy 6 is offline
Fear This Man
 
Easy 6's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: the goldilocks zone
Casino cash: $31377
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlyonsd
I just got done with Bob Dole's biography, One Soldier's Story.

He's quite a guy. For some reason I thought he had a prosthetic arm but that isn't the case. The nerves were damaged from a shell burst in Italy, to the point the arm is practically useless, although he can move it some.

The book was pretty dry though, his sense of humor is just about as lame in writing, much like it is here on CP.
Bob Dole is 'Ol Skool, he doesnt cotton to a bunch of soft or funny talk.
Posts: 31,253
Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.Easy 6 is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 10:41 AM   #427
KC Jones KC Jones is offline
Genious
 
KC Jones's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Colorado
Casino cash: $7942
I recently finished Giants in the Earth and I heartily recommend it. I can't stop thinking about the ending.

It's an old novel (1920's I think) originally written in Norwegian about some Norwegian pioneer families settling the Dakota territory in the late 19th Century.

I just started yet another Pratchett book, "Monstrous Regiment".
__________________
re-sign: to sign again
resign: to withdraw from employment
Posts: 5,335
KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 10:51 AM   #428
Adept Havelock Adept Havelock is offline
Obligatory Thoughtcriminal
 
Adept Havelock's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Flux,awaiting an observer
Casino cash: $5000
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC Jones
I just started yet another Pratchett book, "Monstrous Regiment".
I love Pratchett. Probably the best satirist writing today. That one is a bit different, but fun.
__________________
No matter how cynical you are, it is impossible to keep up. -Lily Tomlin

I'd rather be a climbing monkey than a falling angel. -Terry Pratchett
Posts: 14,303
Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.Adept Havelock is not part of the Right 53.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 10:56 AM   #429
chief52 chief52 is offline
Veteran
 
chief52's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: NoCal
Casino cash: $5255
Just starting " Devil in the White City " by Erik Larson. Anyone read it? Turn of the century in Chicago.
Posts: 3,101
chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.chief52 is not part of the Right 53.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 11:48 AM   #430
EyePod EyePod is offline
Forgetting 2013 season end.
 
EyePod's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around
Casino cash: $5830
I know that fantasy isn't typically considered "high brow reading," but George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series is AMAZING. I'd recommend it to anyone.
Posts: 5,568
EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.EyePod must have mowed badgirl's lawn.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 11:51 AM   #431
Fairplay Fairplay is offline
MVP
 
Fairplay's Avatar
 

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: state of mind
Casino cash: $15275
Quote:
Originally Posted by chief52
Just starting " Devil in the White City " by Erik Larson. Anyone read it? Turn of the century in Chicago.

I think frazod read it. I think its mentioned in this thread a ways back.
Posts: 18,907
Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.Fairplay is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 12:02 PM   #432
Frazod Frazod is offline
Banned
 
Frazod's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: my own personal pig hell
Casino cash: $5050
Quote:
Originally Posted by chief52
Just starting " Devil in the White City " by Erik Larson. Anyone read it? Turn of the century in Chicago.
I read it earlier in the year. Good read - interesting hybrid mix of crime story with history of the fair.
Posts: 91,125
Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.Frazod < Tried to steal Andy's chili fries.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2007, 04:43 PM   #433
KC Jones KC Jones is offline
Genious
 
KC Jones's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Colorado
Casino cash: $7942
Quote:
Originally Posted by EyePod
I know that fantasy isn't typically considered "high brow reading," but George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series is AMAZING. I'd recommend it to anyone.
I started that series and yes, it is amazingly well written. Especially the first book. Halfway through the second I set it down and I've never gone back. Not that it says much about the book, I do that with books and series I really like sometimes. At some point I plan to go back and start over.
__________________
re-sign: to sign again
resign: to withdraw from employment
Posts: 5,335
KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.KC Jones must have mowed badgirl's lawn.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2007, 09:50 AM   #434
NewChief NewChief is offline
Greenbacker and Loving Liberal
 
NewChief's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Fayetteville, AR
Casino cash: $9694
Salon does their annual book awards. The two I'm really dying to read are the Denis Johnson book and the new Michael Chabon:

http://www.salon.com/books/awards/20...oks/print.html
Fiction
Quote:


"The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" by Junot Díaz

The title character of Díaz' first novel is an obese Dominican-American geek living in New Jersey, with a baleful, dying mother, a devoted punkette sister and a heart full of thwarted romance. With grace and brio, Díaz conjures a world that encompasses everything from streetwise Spanglish to Dungeons and Dragons, campus politics to immigrant family saga. And guess what? It all fits perfectly, because, as it turns out, there is no better analogy for Rafael Trujillo, the fearsome real-life Dominican dictator, than Tolkien's Sauron -- no matter how far Díaz extends the metaphor, it keeps on working; "What's more sci-fi than Santo Domingo?" Oscar asks. And what fantasy could be more heartbreaking than the yearning of an oddball "ghetto nerd" (or anyone else for that matter) for perfect love?

"Sacred Games" by Vikram Chandra"

At the beginning of Chandra's vast, electrifying second novel, Mumbai's most notorious gangster dies in a strange, cube-shaped bunker after a shootout with the police; the rest of the book tells us why. The man in charge of unearthing the truth is a courtly, middle-aged Sikh police detective named Sartaj Singh, who follows the trail through a dirty, maddening, glorious city that rivals Dickens' London in ruthlessness and vitality. Mumbai may be violent and trashy, drunk on Bollywood dreams and choking on its own smog, but it's the real hero of this story; Chandra clearly loves it to distraction even when it horrifies him. The villain is not a criminal, really, but fanaticism in all its forms, and the battle is literally between life and death, between those who understand that this world is necessarily chaotic, flawed and painful and those whose craving for order, calm and purity make them so very, very dangerous.

"Then We Came to the End" by Joshua Ferris

"We, too, thought it would never end," say a group of ad agency employees in late-20th-century Chicago, speaking of the Internet- fueled economic boom. Joshua Ferris, a former adman himself, has written his first novel entirely in the first-person plural, capturing the way a bunch of mismatched strangers, when thrown together in an office, can learn to function as a single, organic entity. Or not. "Then We Came to the End" is a deeper, sharper, sadder version of that popular Thursday-night sitcom, filled with recognizable types -- the office intellectual staying late to work on his novel, the conspiracy theorist, the woman who knows all the gossip, the guy everybody distrusts, the talented boss they all regard with slightly awestruck incomprehension. There are intrigues over Aeron chairs and paranoia once the layoffs begin, as well as intimations of tragedy throughout. Against the odds, and half the time against the will of the people involved, a single, organic entity does emerge, but what to do with it? Ferris has taken one of the unsung experiences of modern life and delicately exposed its complicated, conflicted heart.

"Tree of Smoke" by Denis Johnson

The Vietnam novel to end all Vietnam novels, Denis Johnson's celebrated (and misunderstood) epic takes all the genre's clichés, from the dangerously naive CIA officer to the feral tunnel rats to the cigar-chomping colonel who thinks he can win this thing, and runs them through a blender. The result recasts the war not as a tale of American hubris and Cold War skullduggery gone wrong, not even as a tragedy belonging to a specific place or time, but as a titanic clash between two fundamentally different ways of understanding the universe and how it works. That collision plays out through shattering battle scenes and sweaty afternoons in tin-shack bars, through the after-dinner philosophizing of deluded spies and the calculations of villagers just trying to make it to the next planting season. Johnson's magnificent vision is less tragic than cosmic, the story of history repeating itself not because we don't understand, but repeating itself whether we understand it or not.

"The Yiddish Policeman's Union" by Michael Chabon

During World War II, the Roosevelt administration briefly considered resettling Europe's Jewish refugees in Alaska. Michael Chabon's soulful alternate-history novel dreams up what the world might have looked like if that scheme had played out. In a bustling, if well-bundled, Yiddish-speaking community in Sitka, a burnt-out homicide cop named Meyer Landsman investigates the death of a junkie chess-player who might have been the promised Messiah, and gets on the bad side of the district's Hassidim-run organized crime syndicate. The novel offers lots of genre fun -- snappy dialogue, action and suspense -- yet it's all seamlessly married to a searching consideration of Jewish identity. What would it mean to be a Jew in a world where the Holocaust never happened and the state of Israel didn't exist? Are human beings the products of history, or does our essence transcend it? These are weighty questions for a book that's so entertaining, but Chabon's themes never overload his frame. Like the very best dancers and magicians, he makes it look easy.

Non-Fiction
Quote:
"The Father of All Things" by Tom Bissell

The two books about Vietnam on our list this year prompt a question: When is a war truly over? Can a soldier ever really "get out"? Tom Bissell's engrossing memoir about his relationship to his father, a Vietnam veteran, offers a sobering illustration of how a war's legacy can extend across generations. Tom Bissell wasn't born until after his father returned from Southeast Asia, yet in his mind the collapse of South Vietnam and the crumbling of his parents' marriage are "endlessly connected." At the heart of "The Father of All Things" is a journey the two men took together to Vietnam, 40 years after Bissell's father last set foot in that country. By turns hilarious, grief-stricken, perplexed and enlightening, Bissell's account of that trip offers a new understanding of the war, one designed for all those Americans who, though too young to remember it, still live in its shadow.

"Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations" by Georgina Howell

Born into Victorian wealth and propriety in 1860s Britain, Gertrude Bell abandoned convention in her 30s to become a mountain climber and explorer, crisscrossing the Arabian desert on her own in the years before World War I, excavating archaeological sites, befriending chieftains and sheiks and writing best-selling books about her adventures. Her political expertise and influence in the region were so prized by Winston Churchill that after the war she became, with T.E. Lawrence, the chief architect of modern Iraq. Unfortunately, her personal life was less successful; ill-fated love affairs and family tragedies took their toll. A woman of great physical courage, panache and intelligence (she spoke six languages, wrote and translated poetry, drew maps for the British Army and photographed ancient ruins), Bell is a dream subject for any biographer, and Howell turns her story into a ripping yarn, complete with detailed accounts of Bell's early, life-and-death exploits while mountaineering in the Alps.

"Legacy of Ashes: A History of the CIA" by Tim Weiner

Before Sept. 11, most Americans (not to mention foreign nationals) would probably have described the Central Intelligence Agency as a puppet-master operation with eyes everywhere, skillfully manipulating world events from behind the scenes. Since the terrorist attacks of 2001, and the revelations of faulty intelligence contributing to the buildup to the Iraq war, we've caught a glimpse of a different but equally troubling CIA. Tim Weiner's fascinating and masterfully reported "Legacy of Ashes" locks this new image in place. It reveals an agency chronically and often disastrously short on solid intelligence, and all too prone to embarking on half-baked covert operations with little concern for the long-term consequences (or even the short-term ones). Weiner, working from impeccable sources, documents that the CIA's recent bumblings represent more than just a temporary difficulty adjusting to the post-Cold War world; incompetence has been a major problem since the agency's inception. The implications of this story are scary (America is in desperate need of a decent overseas intelligence service), but the telling is never less than compulsively readable.

"The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved" by Judith Freeman

Raymond Chandler -- the supreme master of hard-boiled prose and founder of the bruised-romantic school of noir heroes -- is also the poet laureate of the seedy side of Los Angeles. Judith Freeman, a novelist fascinated by the intersection between Chandler's detective fiction and his real life, became curious about the writer's unusual marriage to a woman almost 20 years his senior. Material on Cissy Chandler's life is scarce (her husband burned all her papers after her death), so Freeman decided to exercise her fiction-writer's skills on the clues that remain: a long inventory Cissy kept of Ray's collection of glass animals, a remark he made about his wife's habit of doing housework in the nude, a handful of photographs and poems, etc. Most evocative are the excursions Freeman makes to houses and apartments the Chandlers rented throughout the city (the couple moved a lot), extended wanderings through a city that seems both lost and timeless. Her version of L.A. is as moodily unforgettable as Chandler's, a fitting tribute to the "new kind of American loneliness" born there and the man who made it his muse.

"The World Without Us" by Alan Weisman

"Imaginative" is not a word customarily applied to environmental reporting, but Alan Weisman's "The World Without Us" deserves that praise. Rather than trying to dent our apathy with dire images of melting glaciers and megahurricanes, he takes the opposite approach, describing how quickly and utterly the planet would be changed if the human race simply vanished. Within days, New York's subway tunnels would flood, leading to the corrosion of steel supports and the eventual collapse of the streets: Lexington Avenue "becomes a river." Suburban subdivisions fare no better, shattered by frozen pipes and devoured by mold and termites. Our cats would do just fine, but the dogs ... not so much (too dependent on humanity and vulnerable to larger predators). The earth's air and water would soon sweeten without us around to poison it, but our plastic crap, all those bottles and bags, will be sticking around until some microbe figures out how to turn them into lunch. For some reason, this doomsday scenario is more thrilling than depressing, perhaps because it beguiles us into doing what often seems beyond our power -- picturing a much healthier planet -- and considering a less drastic way to get there.
__________________
In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican.
- H. L. Mencken
Posts: 19,434
NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.NewChief has enough rep power to blowy ou to bits.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2007, 10:02 AM   #435
the Talking Can the Talking Can is offline
Gonzo = Sexy Bitch
 
the Talking Can's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: street
Casino cash: $10236
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewPhin
Salon does their annual book awards. The two I'm really dying to read are the Denis Johnson book and the new Michael Chabon:

http://www.salon.com/books/awards/20...oks/print.html
Fiction



Non-Fiction
Jesus' Son is one of my favorite books, and I also like Johnson's poetry...his other fiction hasn't moved me the same way...no point probably in reading harsh reviews, but here is one if you're curious:

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200712/vietnam
__________________
Clark Hunt: "Thank god for the Dominican pool boy"
Posts: 49,211
the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.the Talking Can is obviously part of the inner Circle.
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:07 PM.


This is a test for a client's site.
A new website that shows member-created construction site listings that need fill or have excess fill. Dirt Monkey @ https://DirtMonkey.net
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.