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Old 06-05-2013, 02:03 AM  
KILLER_CLOWN KILLER_CLOWN is offline
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Monsanto sued by Kansas wheat farmer over release of unapproved GMO wheat in Oregon

Madison Ruppert
Activist Post

A wheat farmer in Kansas has filed a lawsuit against Monsanto alleging that the infamous agricultural giant is guilty of gross negligence for not containing unapproved genetically modified wheat which was recently discovered in Oregon.

The farmer, Ernest Barnes, said that Monsanto’s GMO wheat has put all of the United States’ wheat export sales at risk. Meanwhile, Monsanto claims they have no clue how the “Roundup Ready” strain of wheat ended up in an Oregon field since they say they abandoned their research in 2004.

http://endthelie.com/2013/06/04/mons...heat-survived/

Indeed, Barnes is quite right in saying that the discovery has already impacted U.S. wheat exports. Japan canceled part of a tender to buy U.S. western white wheat. Japan is one of the largest export markets for U.S. wheat.

http://endthelie.com/2013/05/31/mons...europe-report/

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...0EB1JC20130530

South Korea also suspended imports of U.S. wheat and said they would increase inspections of imports.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-styl...icle-1.1359806

The EU similarly said they will test incoming shipments and will block any shipments containing GMO wheat.

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/eu-test-u-w...100808757.html

“Monsanto has released GE (genetically engineered) wheat into the non-genetically modified wheat population,” Barnes’ petition states.

The “plaintiff has been harmed by any and all Monsanto GE wheat because it has impacted wheat exports and the price of wheat,” the petition adds, according to Reuters.

http://news.yahoo.com/kansas-wheat-f...155201442.html

The unfortunate reality is that the scale of the spread of Monsanto’s unapproved GMO wheat is not quite known at this point.


Reuters points out that it is not even known if it “has contaminated food supplies” leading to multiple countries backing away from purchasing U.S. wheat.

While the lawsuit does not state a specific claim for damages, it does say that the amount in dispute exceeds $75,000.

Barnes seeks damages to be determined at trial, according to the Associated Press. However, AP notes that Warren Burns, one of Barnes’ attorneys, said that the scope of damages is potentially in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/...wheat/2388957/

While the U.S. Department of Agriculture claims that Oregon wheat is safe to eat and that there is no evidence showing that the GMO wheat entered the marketplace, entire countries apparently aren’t willing to take their word for it.

“These types of suits serve the purpose of helping police the agricultural system we have in place and make sure farmers are protected,” Burns told AP.

While Barnes’ lawsuit is believed to be the first in response to the discovery, his attorney said that
similar suits are in the works, according to AP.

The cases may be consolidated to make the process of discovery easier. Discovery involves obtaining, investigating and sharing evidence among parties.

As expected, Monsanto has been critical of the lawsuit.

“Tractor-chasing lawyers have prematurely filed suit without any evidence of fault and in advance of the crop’s harvest,” David Snively, Monsanto executive vice president and general counsel, said.

Monsanto claims that they followed a “government-directed, rigorous, well-documented and audited” process of closing out their GMO wheat program.

They pointed out that on average wheat seed is only viable for one or two years in the soil. One must wonder then, where did the contamination come from if the program was so rigorously closed out some nine years ago?

Monsanto claims that they are not to be held liable for the contaminated crop because they took so much care to prevent contamination.

“Given the care undertaken, no legal liability exists and the company will present a vigorous defense,” Monsanto said in a statement

Obviously the contamination still happened so it’s unclear just how much care was actually taken.

The case has been assigned to U.S. District Judge Monti Belot of the U.S. District Court in Wichita, Kansas.

Burns said that he thinks the lawsuit will remain in U.S. District Court in Kansas due to the “tremendous amount of harm [that] has fallen on Kansas and Kansas farms.”

“We view it as very important to maintaining farmers and maintaining the way of life they lead which is very important not only to this country but countries around the world to which we export,” Burns said.

“It is hard to underestimate the importance of the American wheat crop in sustaining people around the globe,” Burns added, according to AP.

If the unapproved GMO wheat is found to be more widespread than the initial discovery in Oregon, the U.S. wheat exports estimated to be worth around $9 billion this year could be put at even greater risk.


http://www.activistpost.com/2013/06/...at-farmer.html
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:49 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by BucEyedPea View Post
Here. Google is your friend Dr. Mengele. A little work won't kill ya'!

This is brief enough and easy to understand. Conventional versus Organic Farming....covers soil.
http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/miss...rganic-farming
It really sucks that they do those practices because the mean old USDA says they have to if they want to be organic.
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Old 06-05-2013, 03:03 PM   #92
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Modern wheat a "perfect, chronic poison," doctor says

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Old 06-05-2013, 04:54 PM   #93
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OK, this back and forth has jumped the shark to the point that people lost sight of the salient point.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with organic growing. If a grower takes care of the soil, harvests the fruit at its ripest, then you will get great results. I'm not going to argue that. I don't think anyone here is.

But if you take that same situation and treat the plant with a pesticide (at the label rate) it will become non-organic. But you will not be able to tell the difference come harvest time. I guarantee it. There is also NO loss in nutritional value. None.

Now, if you run a commercial vegetable farm, harvest the fruit slightly underripe to prevent spoilage during transport, whether you use pesticides or not, they will taste different than the smaller local farm or personal garden. Absolutely. But the difference is NOT because of the pesticide or if is GMO. It is because of all the other factors.

There are plenty of reasons to question the practice of GMOs. I outlined them in an earlier post. But their nutritional difference to their non-GMO or organic brethren is nil if all other factors are equal.

But I get it. Making an emotional argument that some big corporation is poisoning us is a more effective way to grab the public's attention. It's a common technique by all politicians and anyone who hype a special interest. "It's for the children!" "They will throw grandma over the cliff!" "War on women!". But it is also intellectually bankrupt.
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Old 06-05-2013, 05:25 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BucEyedPea View Post
Yup....but, but, but this was not reported in a peer reviewed journal and therefore is not science.
It does taste like crap. No flavor. The sweetness of something organic is noticeable...that's the extra minerals provided by nature. Minerals are the sparkplugs that make vitamins effective. Also, something from your own garden even tastes better. Oh, but this is not evidence. You did not taste that. You need to read a journal by the authorities. Free market of ideas is just dangerous...at least to those from the control ideologies.
Jesus ****. Not this shit again.

In addition to donkhaters post another reason that organics typically taste better is because they select hybrids that are hardy and easy to grow on a large scale. Organics typically don't. Unless they're corporate organics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by donkhater View Post
I've been down this road before with this crowd. Organics typical do taste better because they are harvested closer to ripeness. Take a non-organic and an organic fruit or vegetable of the same variety, let them both mature on the plant and you won't be able to tell the difference.

Non-organics are harvested earlier and allowed to ripen en route to the market. They typical will lose a little sugar development. However, they are treated with a fungicide to prevent rot during transport, something organics cannot (or should not).

If you are eating mass-produced organics that aren't local, you are gambling with your life IMO.
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Originally Posted by donkhater View Post
Reading through threads like this can really reveal those who know and understand the actual science behind GMO crops and those that don't.

There are legitimate questions about GMO crops. IMO opinion they include:

1. The overuse of the pesticide that is used just because the crop in question is immune and weeds are becoming resistant to the treaments.

2. The dwindling diversity of seeds that are used.

3. The business paractices and monopolization of agriculture by Monsanto. Their ethics are non-existant.

But as to the actual safety of the plant or crop itself? There is no rational scientific basis to question that. Open a genetics book and read up a bit.
#1 is tough to overcome. There haven't been any new herbicide chemistries available since the 70's IIRC. Three have been different formulations, but there are only so many on the market right now. Hopefully they can get some more coming.

If you're talking about RR corn allowing people to use glyphosate exclusively creating glyphosate resistant marestail and kochia, yeah, that's right. But part of that is Monsanto reps pushing that type of program.

#2 I agree with. Corn is still in decent shape. Sorghum is markedly short of genetics, and nobody seems to give a ****.

#3 I don't agree with. Monsanto is a pile of shit company, and I'd venture a guess that Monsanto hasn't cost anybody on this board more money than me. But really, the ag sector is really competitive. Syngenta, Dow, and Bayer (on the chemical side) are all huge competitors to Monsanto and have demolished Monsanto on some product battles. Now, that's not to say that those 4 haven't ate up a BUNCH of smaller companies, particularly Syngenta and Monsanto. But in the grand scheme of business, it happens in every industry. It's happening in commercial agriculture also. It happened in computer manufacturers, phone manufacturers, retail stores, all of it. It's just the nature of business.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz_TinBalls View Post
"the earth" doesn't grow GMO food -- people do it and they are constricted from proper soil because as the dollar plummets, resources needed to enrich proper growing soils for food are neglected.

It's not usually the seed quality that makes foods taste so vastly different, it is the resources used to grow them.
That is mind bogglingly incorrect. Organics don't have the tools available to appropriately feed the crops. All they have available is manure, for the most part. I've heard of some people spraying fish oil and shit, but for the most part it is manure. While manure has high P rates, it has insufficient N and K to grow crops. Accordingly, organics mine the soil for those nutrients leaving it barren.

In my neighborhood there are some organics growing organic irrigated corn. He's shooting for 30 bu irrigated corn. County average on irrigated corn IIRC is 180. So he plows instead of using herbicides, applies manure, and mines the organic matter in the soil for the additional required N. Then he plants, cultivates it (plows between the rows) and ends up with a collossal weedy mess because he can't cultivate after it gets about 24 inches tall and there is no residual herbicides available. And he's shooting and happy with 30 bushel to the acre.

Meanwhile, we feed our soils, apply the same manure, supplement it with NH3 or UAN, and additional MAP or DAP if more P is needed. There isn't really any K needed around here. Plus we can tissue sample for micronutrients and apply them if needed. We keep our soils happy and healthy. Organics mine them because they have no choice.
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Old 06-05-2013, 05:36 PM   #95
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My thoughts on the suit.

It's going to be tough to make anything happen. Monsanto is diligent. And accordingly, I'm surprised. A neighbor of mine leases land to Monsanto to test new genetics. They restrict access and grind the corn. That's kind of a big deal in this part of the world. But they're serious about it. I grow an IMPACT test plot for Monsanto for varieties that are much closer to market. They don't freak the **** out like they do for my neighbor, but nothing suggests that they are careless. Genetics are their game. They take care of what takes care of them. They can't afford to just let their millions of dollars of R&D float around because nobody gives a ****. That's just not what I've experienced.

Japan and Korea pulling out of the market? That's purely political IMO. They can pull out, the market freaks and shits all over the carpet, and the price goes down. Then they can get in at the lower price. Win for everybody except Buehler445 and all other wheat growers.

As for glyphosate resistant wheat is something I don't want on my farm. Glyphosate is really the only effective way to control volunteer.
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Old 06-05-2013, 06:25 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Buehler445 View Post
#3 I don't agree with. Monsanto is a pile of shit company, and I'd venture a guess that Monsanto hasn't cost anybody on this board more money than me. But really, the ag sector is really competitive. Syngenta, Dow, and Bayer (on the chemical side) are all huge competitors to Monsanto and have demolished Monsanto on some product battles. Now, that's not to say that those 4 haven't ate up a BUNCH of smaller companies, particularly Syngenta and Monsanto. But in the grand scheme of business, it happens in every industry. It's happening in commercial agriculture also. It happened in computer manufacturers, phone manufacturers, retail stores, all of it. It's just the nature of business.
The ag science industry has consolidated tremendously in the last couple decades. The major players are Monsanto, Syngenta, Bayer, BASF, Dow AgroSciences and DuPont. There are a few innovative Japanese companies, but they focus on Japan and tend to collaborate with one of the other major firms to globalize their technologies.

However, Monsanto does dominate (monopolize) the seed market, particularly in soybeans. They currently have the best germplasm (seed) in which to express traits. The other companies, except perhaps DuPont, can develop trait technologies all they want, but if they don't have the seed company, which Monasanto does, then that trait goes nowhere. Dow has just launched Enlist with Monsanto. Believe me, if they could, Dow would rather not deal with Monsanto, but they have no choice if they want to commercialize their invention.
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Old 06-05-2013, 09:22 PM   #97
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Originally Posted by mr. tegu View Post
So all GMO food is grown in less quality soil than non GMO foods. Got it.
Do you know anything about farming? Clearly the answer is no. I bet you think commercial fertilizer has "everything your plant needs".
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Old 06-06-2013, 08:07 AM   #98
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Originally Posted by donkhater View Post
The ag science industry has consolidated tremendously in the last couple decades. The major players are Monsanto, Syngenta, Bayer, BASF, Dow AgroSciences and DuPont. There are a few innovative Japanese companies, but they focus on Japan and tend to collaborate with one of the other major firms to globalize their technologies.

However, Monsanto does dominate (monopolize) the seed market, particularly in soybeans. They currently have the best germplasm (seed) in which to express traits. The other companies, except perhaps DuPont, can develop trait technologies all they want, but if they don't have the seed company, which Monasanto does, then that trait goes nowhere. Dow has just launched Enlist with Monsanto. Believe me, if they could, Dow would rather not deal with Monsanto, but they have no choice if they want to commercialize their invention.
Well, I know they bought the RR technology from Monsanto. I'm not really up on beans. From my understanding corn is where the big money is at, and the genetics there are varied quite a bit.
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:15 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz_TinBalls View Post
"the earth" doesn't grow GMO food -- people do it and they are constricted from proper soil because as the dollar plummets, resources needed to enrich proper growing soils for food are neglected.

It's not usually the seed quality that makes foods taste so vastly different, it is the resources used to grow them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buehler445 View Post

That is mind bogglingly incorrect. Organics don't have the tools available to appropriately feed the crops. All they have available is manure, for the most part. I've heard of some people spraying fish oil and shit, but for the most part it is manure. While manure has high P rates, it has insufficient N and K to grow crops. Accordingly, organics mine the soil for those nutrients leaving it barren.

In my neighborhood there are some organics growing organic irrigated corn. He's shooting for 30 bu irrigated corn. County average on irrigated corn IIRC is 180. So he plows instead of using herbicides, applies manure, and mines the organic matter in the soil for the additional required N. Then he plants, cultivates it (plows between the rows) and ends up with a collossal weedy mess because he can't cultivate after it gets about 24 inches tall and there is no residual herbicides available. And he's shooting and happy with 30 bushel to the acre.

Meanwhile, we feed our soils, apply the same manure, supplement it with NH3 or UAN, and additional MAP or DAP if more P is needed. There isn't really any K needed around here. Plus we can tissue sample for micronutrients and apply them if needed. We keep our soils happy and healthy. Organics mine them because they have no choice.
what the **** are you talking about dude? There's nothing in my post discussing "organics". what do you grow?
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:22 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donkhater View Post
The ag science industry has consolidated tremendously in the last couple decades. The major players are Monsanto, Syngenta, Bayer, BASF, Dow AgroSciences and DuPont. There are a few innovative Japanese companies, but they focus on Japan and tend to collaborate with one of the other major firms to globalize their technologies.

However, Monsanto does dominate (monopolize) the seed market, particularly in soybeans. They currently have the best germplasm (seed) in which to express traits. The other companies, except perhaps DuPont, can develop trait technologies all they want, but if they don't have the seed company, which Monasanto does, then that trait goes nowhere. Dow has just launched Enlist with Monsanto. Believe me, if they could, Dow would rather not deal with Monsanto, but they have no choice if they want to commercialize their invention.
Monsanto received a Billion dollar settlement in the Pioneer/Monsanto dispute...Dupont made a .8 billion dollar deal with Monsanto and in the deal was pay the settlement billion. I guess one could say that Dupont has 1.8 billion reasons why they have to deal with Monsanto.
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:30 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by Buzz_TinBalls View Post
what the **** are you talking about dude? There's nothing in my post discussing "organics". what do you grow?
It's typically organics that market the non-GMO products.

Wheat
Corn
Sorghum
Oats
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:34 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by Buzz_TinBalls View Post
what the **** are you talking about dude? There's nothing in my post discussing "organics". what do you grow?
And if you're not talking about organic v conventional, WTF are you talking about?
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:45 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by Buzz_TinBalls View Post
"the earth" doesn't grow GMO food -- people do it and they are constricted from proper soil because as the dollar plummets, resources needed to enrich proper growing soils for food are neglected.

It's not usually the seed quality that makes foods taste so vastly different, it is the resources used to grow them.
I'm just curious, but who fed you the line of shit I put in bold?
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:57 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by ghak99 View Post
I'm just curious, but who fed you the line of shit I put in bold?
Try diagraming what he said
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:37 AM   #105
CleveSteve CleveSteve is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fish View Post
Why would you think GMOs would be less nutritious? It's fundamentally the same thing. That doesn't make any sense.
Actually, if you are genuinely interested, most changes we make to our food, whether through GMO or selective breeding alters the nutritional content. Here's a New York Times article with some very interesting information. Sorry, I can't post active links, so I'm posting a copy/paste link.

nytimes.com/2013/05/26/opinion/sunday/breeding-the-nutrition-out-of-our-food.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Breeding the Nutrition Out of Our Food
By JO ROBINSON
Published: May 25, 2013 285 Comments

WE like the idea that food can be the answer to our ills, that if we eat nutritious foods we won’t need medicine or supplements. We have valued this notion for a long, long time. The Greek physician Hippocrates proclaimed nearly 2,500 years ago: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Today, medical experts concur. If we heap our plates with fresh fruits and vegetables, they tell us, we will come closer to optimum health.

This health directive needs to be revised. If we want to get maximum health benefits from fruits and vegetables, we must choose the right varieties. Studies published within the past 15 years show that much of our produce is relatively low in phytonutrients, which are the compounds with the potential to reduce the risk of four of our modern scourges: cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and dementia. The loss of these beneficial nutrients did not begin 50 or 100 years ago, as many assume. Unwittingly, we have been stripping phytonutrients from our diet since we stopped foraging for wild plants some 10,000 years ago and became farmers.

These insights have been made possible by new technology that has allowed researchers to compare the phytonutrient content of wild plants with the produce in our supermarkets. The results are startling.

Wild dandelions, once a springtime treat for Native Americans, have seven times more phytonutrients than spinach, which we consider a “superfood.” A purple potato native to Peru has 28 times more cancer-fighting anthocyanins than common russet potatoes. One species of apple has a staggering 100 times more phytonutrients than the Golden Delicious displayed in our supermarkets.

Were the people who foraged for these wild foods healthier than we are today? They did not live nearly as long as we do, but growing evidence suggests that they were much less likely to die from degenerative diseases, even the minority who lived 70 years and more. The primary cause of death for most adults, according to anthropologists, was injury and infections.

Each fruit and vegetable in our stores has a unique history of nutrient loss, I’ve discovered, but there are two common themes. Throughout the ages, our farming ancestors have chosen the least bitter plants to grow in their gardens. It is now known that many of the most beneficial phytonutrients have a bitter, sour or astringent taste. Second, early farmers favored plants that were relatively low in fiber and high in sugar, starch and oil. These energy-dense plants were pleasurable to eat and provided the calories needed to fuel a strenuous lifestyle. The more palatable our fruits and vegetables became, however, the less advantageous they were for our health.

The sweet corn that we serve at summer dinners illustrates both of these trends. The wild ancestor of our present-day corn is a grassy plant called teosinte. It is hard to see the family resemblance. Teosinte is a bushy plant with short spikes of grain instead of ears, and each spike has only 5 to 12 kernels. The kernels are encased in shells so dense you’d need a hammer to crack them open. Once you extract the kernels, you wonder why you bothered. The dry tidbit of food is a lot of starch and little sugar. Teosinte has 10 times more protein than the corn we eat today, but it was not soft or sweet enough to tempt our ancestors.

Over several thousand years, teosinte underwent several spontaneous mutations. Nature’s rewriting of the genome freed the kernels of their cases and turned a spike of grain into a cob with kernels of many colors. Our ancestors decided that this transformed corn was tasty enough to plant in their gardens. By the 1400s, corn was central to the diet of people living throughout Mexico and the Americas.

When European colonists first arrived in North America, they came upon what they called “Indian corn.” John Winthrop Jr., governor of the colony of Connecticut in the mid-1600s, observed that American Indians grew “corne with great variety of colours,” citing “red, yellow, blew, olive colour, and greenish, and some very black and some of intermediate degrees.” A few centuries later, we would learn that black, red and blue corn is rich in anthocyanins. Anthocyanins have the potential to fight cancer, calm inflammation, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, protect the aging brain, and reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

EUROPEAN settlers were content with this colorful corn until the summer of 1779 when they found something more delectable — a yellow variety with sweeter and more tender kernels. This unusual variety came to light that year after George Washington ordered a scorched-earth campaign against Iroquois tribes. While the militia was destroying the food caches of the Iroquois and burning their crops, soldiers came across a field of extra-sweet yellow corn. According to one account, a lieutenant named Richard Bagnal took home some seeds to share with others. Our old-fashioned sweet corn is a direct descendant of these spoils of war.

Up until this time, nature had been the primary change agent in remaking corn. Farmers began to play a more active role in the 19th century. In 1836, Noyes Darling, a onetime mayor of New Haven, and a gentleman farmer, was the first to use scientific methods to breed a new variety of corn. His goal was to create a sweet, all-white variety that was “fit for boiling” by mid-July.

He succeeded, noting with pride that he had rid sweet corn of “the disadvantage of being yellow.”

The disadvantage of being yellow, we now know, had been an advantage to human health. Corn with deep yellow kernels, including the yellow corn available in our grocery stores, has nearly 60 times more beta-carotene than white corn, valuable because it turns to Vitamin A in the body, which helps vision and the immune system.

SUPERSWEET corn, which now outsells all other kinds of corn, was derived from spontaneous mutations that were selected for their high sugar content. In 1959, a geneticist named John Laughnan was studying a handful of mutant kernels and popped a few into his mouth. He was startled by their intense sweetness. Lab tests showed that they were up to 10 times sweeter than ordinary sweet corn.

Mr. Laughnan was not a plant breeder, but he realized at once that this mutant corn would revolutionize the sweet corn industry. He became an entrepreneur overnight and spent years developing commercial varieties of supersweet corn. His first hybrids began to be sold in 1961.

Within one generation, the new extra sugary varieties eclipsed old-fashioned sweet corn in the marketplace. Build a sweeter fruit or vegetable — by any means — and we will come. Today, most of the fresh corn in our supermarkets is extra-sweet. The kernels are either white, pale yellow, or a combination of the two. The sweetest varieties approach 40 percent sugar, bringing new meaning to the words “candy corn.” Only a handful of farmers in the United States specialize in multicolored Indian corn, and it is generally sold for seasonal decorations, not food.

We’ve reduced the nutrients and increased the sugar and starch content of hundreds of other fruits and vegetables. How can we begin to recoup the losses?

Here are some suggestions to get you started. Select corn with deep yellow kernels. To recapture the lost anthocyanins and beta-carotene, cook with blue, red or purple cornmeal, which is available in some supermarkets and on the Internet. Make a stack of blue cornmeal pancakes for Sunday breakfast and top with maple syrup.

In the lettuce section, look for arugula. Arugula, also called salad rocket, is very similar to its wild ancestor. Some varieties were domesticated as recently as the 1970s, thousands of years after most fruits and vegetables had come under our sway. The greens are rich in cancer-fighting compounds called glucosinolates and higher in antioxidant activity than many green lettuces.

Scallions, or green onions, are jewels of nutrition hiding in plain sight. They resemble wild onions and are just as good for you. Remarkably, they have more than five times more phytonutrients than many common onions do. The green portions of scallions are more nutritious than the white bulbs, so use the entire plant. Herbs are wild plants incognito. We’ve long valued them for their intense flavors and aroma, which is why they’ve not been given a flavor makeover. Because we’ve left them well enough alone, their phytonutrient content has remained intact.

Experiment with using large quantities of mild-tasting fresh herbs. Add one cup of mixed chopped Italian parsley and basil to a pound of ground grass-fed beef or poultry to make “herb-burgers.” Herbs bring back missing phytonutrients and a touch of wild flavor as well.

The United States Department of Agriculture exerts far more effort developing disease-resistant fruits and vegetables than creating new varieties to enhance the disease resistance of consumers. In fact, I’ve interviewed U.S.D.A. plant breeders who have spent a decade or more developing a new variety of pear or carrot without once measuring its nutritional content.

We can’t increase the health benefits of our produce if we don’t know which nutrients it contains. Ultimately, we need more than an admonition to eat a greater quantity of fruits and vegetables: we need more fruits and vegetables that have the nutrients we require for optimum health.
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