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Old 05-14-2014, 07:42 AM  
notorious notorious is offline
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3 ways America should be more like Canada


3 ways America should be more like Canada


By Rick Newman


Its middle class is thriving, its people are universally liked and its government actually works.

Fifty years ago, this description might have fit the United States. But not now. America’s middle class is shrinking and its global reputation is spotty. Congress, meanwhile, creates more problems than it solves.

So for guidance on how to fix America, why not look north to Canada, where the mood is upbeat and life appears to be getting demonstrably better? The New York Times recently reported the Canadian middle class is now the world’s richest, surpassing the U.S. for the first time. In the 2014 “better life index” recently published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Canada outscored the United States in 9 of 11 categories, including education, safety and overall life satisfaction.

The poverty rate is lower in Canada, and every Canadian citizen has government-provided health insurance, which might explain why Canadians enjoy longer life expectancy than Americans and are considerably less obese. As for the government, Canada’s national debt amounts to about $18,000 per person, compared with $55,000 in America.

So what is Canada doing right?

It has a more stable banking system. Canada has virtually never experienced a financial crisis, and there were no bailouts north of the border in 2008 when the U.S. government committed $245 billion to save dozens of U.S. banks. The differences between the two countries are somewhat accidental. In the United States, distrust of a strong central government all the way back in the founders’ days led to a system of state-chartered banks vulnerable to political meddling, and therefore riskier than the big, nationally chartered financial institutions that operate in Canada.

“In the United States, instability was permitted by regulators because it served powerful political interests,” Prof. Charles Calomiris of Columbia University wrote in a 2013 paper for the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. “In Canada, the banking system was not used as a means of channeling subsidized credit to a favored political constituency, so there was no need to tolerate instability.” The legacy of that today is a malleable U.S. banking system that, among other things, was deregulated in the late 1990s at the behest of banks themselves — which contributed to the 2008 collapse.

The financial crisis and the abuses that led to it are still holding back the U.S. economy. Shoddy lending standards were a major cause of the housing bust, which has whacked $3 trillion off the value of Americans’ real-estate assets — even with the year-long recovery in the housing market. That’s a huge loss of wealth that continues to hold back U.S. spending. And it’s just part of a 25-year debt binge Americans are still working off. With far fewer lending excesses, Canada didn’t really have a housing bust or a credit crisis to recover from.

Money doesn’t dominate politics. Canada has much stricter rules governing campaign contributions than those in America, where campaign-finance laws are getting weaker on account of recent Supreme Court rulings striking down limits on spending. Tougher limits in Canada give people and businesses with money to spend less influence over laws and regulations. “Every single one of my voters thinks that is terrific,” says former journalist Chrystia Freeland, now a Canadian member of parliament, representing a district in Toronto. “There is a lot less influence of the really wealthy and single-issue interest groups. A regular person has a much bigger voice.”

Many members of the U.S. Congress report spending half their time, or more, raising money for reelection efforts rather than legislating. Freeland estimates she spends less than 5% of her time doing that. There’s virtually no chance the United States will ever adopt a Canadian-style parliamentary system, but Congress could pass new laws or amend the Constitution in order to limit the corrupting influence of Big Money in politics. Were that to happen, however, it would probably make incumbent politicians more vulnerable to challengers. Maybe next century.

There’s less hostility toward immigrants. Canada, like the United States, has limits on the number of foreigners it allows into the country to work. But the whole issue of immigration is far less politicized, and there’s a broad understanding that skilled foreign workers help the economy. Canada actually recruits immigrants, part of a deliberate effort to attract talented foreigners most likely to contribute to economic growth. In the United States, the quota for skilled immigrants is far below the number U.S. firms would hire if they could get them. Despite appeals from many businesses, Congress is paralyzed on reforms that would let more skilled immigrants in, partly because that issue gets conflated with separate reforms aimed at stemming the flow of unskilled illegals.

Canada has its own problems, needless to say. Its government-run healthcare system draws complaints of long wait times for care and trailing-edge medical technology. Some economists think a housing bubble may be forming, for instance, and trends such as rising income inequality affect Canada just as they do every other industrialized country. Plus, it's cold.

In the Land of Moderation, however, such challenges seem manageable. “We’re less anxious because we didn’t have the financial crisis,” says Freeland, “but Canadians should guard against smugness.” Now there's something you're unlikely to hear an American politician say.

http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/daily...150359533.html
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:43 AM   #2
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I agree with some of his ideas, but he leaves out a few important pieces as to why Canada is allowed to do what they do.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:59 AM   #3
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how many wars and 'peace keeping' missions does Canada exhaust its' budget on?

World Police FTW!
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:26 AM   #4
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:48 AM   #5
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:52 AM   #6
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:56 AM   #7
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I think we should always be looking at what works and does not work in other countries but the immigration issues in Canada are very different do to the fact the only country that have a land border with is the United States.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:09 AM   #8
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Assuming the they get NFL coverage up there, Canada seems like it would be a decent place to live.
The cold weather would be a big drawback for me, but global warming should solve that problem in a few years.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:15 AM   #9
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Well, the conservatives have been elected in Canada and they have been handling their debt. I'm sure that helps. Other than that, I would not want to be like another country that is pretty much socialist and sorely in need of economic enlightenment. I also do not agree that it's their HC system that is responsible for their greater longevity. Many of them come here for treatments they can't get in their own country.

It's actually our big centralized bank that created our financial crises at a root level. I don't believe Canada prints money to the same degree we do though or things like CRA and less quals for mortgages. They also still have a lot of poor people---and LOTS of immigrants--especially in big cities like Toronto.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:19 AM   #10
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I think we should always be looking at what works and does not work in other countries but the immigration issues in Canada are very different do to the fact the only country that have a land border with is the United States.
This is true but they have lots of Asians immigration. I believe Asians generally make more money than other immigrant groups because they are more skilled and educated.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:23 AM   #11
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how many wars and 'peace keeping' missions does Canada exhaust its' budget on?

World Police FTW!
Yup! They contribute some to our efforts--because they're somewhat a puppet govt of the US. Also, they are working on integration with the US politically for a EU type arrangement for North America, which will include Mexico. It's no wonder Establishment Republicans are so big on the Keystone Pipeline.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:23 AM   #12
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Why Canada is in better shape then America:

A fraction of the population.

The end.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:28 AM   #13
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This is true but they have lots of Asians immigration. I believe Asians generally make more money than other immigrant groups because they are more skilled and educated.
Traffic accidents must be off the charts up there.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:41 AM   #14
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A Free Market perspective on how Canada escaped the Global Recession

The May 2 triumph of the Conservative Party in Canada's federal election marks a dramatic climax to what has been an unlikely course of political events in a country whose very identity had been inextricably tied to its reputation for being a Liberal stronghold. This shift in political climate becomes all the more striking when viewed against the political developments that had been taking place concurrently in the rest of the developed world.

As Republicans and Democrats pushed America further and further to the left and Europe approached ever closer to its socialist ideals, Canada's political discussion turned from which party could offer the greatest subsidies to the greatest number, to which party's program of tax cuts would be of more benefit to the economy.

For a country where an openly avowed socialist party regularly polls in the top three in provincial and federal elections, this is no small feat. For perhaps the first time in its history, Canada finds itself at the most pro-market limit of the political spectrum among the world's industrialized nations.
But...
By no means is this piece to be taken as an unqualified endorsement of the policies undertaken by the incumbent administration. Despite the overall tenor of the article, this piece could have just as easily been scathing indictment as commendation. The appraisal to be made varies directly with the choice of benchmark. Measured against examples that more closely approximate the free-market ideal such as 1980s-era Hong Kong and Jacksonian America, Canada falls hopelessly short.
And...
No nation is exempt from the laws of economics and, as the United States and Europe are now learning, the ultimate bankruptcy of an unbounded government is just as inexorable in the developed world as it is in third-world countries.
But surely this is all just common sense, the reader may object — and rightly so. It is the specialty of economists to cause rational human beings to forsake the self-evident in favor of absurdities — sometimes to the benefit of society, but more often not. One of the greatest naiveties upheld throughout this episode consisted in the thinking that reckless spending and budget deficits, when they occurred in third-world countries, were a sign of irresponsible government, but that somehow when adopted by developed countries it became "fiscal stimulus."

We are now witnessing the failure of Keynesianism on a grander scale than has ever been experienced — never before has the impotence of Keynesian policy been demonstrated so comprehensively. Regardless of how many Nobel laureates continue to insist that the problem was and continues to be insufficient spending, it is clear that the undoing of Keynesian economic theory is now complete and unequivocal, and one of the greatest frauds ever perpetrated on the public under the guise of economic science has finally been put to rest.
https://mises.org/daily/5583/How-Can...obal-Recession
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:57 AM   #15
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This part of the article in the original post is just not true though:

Quote:
It has a more stable banking system. Canada has virtually never experienced a financial crisis, and there were no bailouts north of the border in 2008 when the U.S. government committed $245 billion to save dozens of U.S. banks.
Politicians lie or abuse language as in Newspeak or use euphemisms and other verbal sleight of hand to claim something is not true. Here's a Canadian version right here:

Quote:
"It is true, we have the only banks in the western world that are not looking at bailouts or anything like that."
~Prime Minister Stephen Harper

What really happened regarding Canadian Banks

Quote:
Politicians always lie; this is no exception. A number of policies were initiated to keep Canadian banks “liquid” during the financial crisis of ’08. Whether this constitutes a bailout boils down to semantics.

True, Canadian banks didn’t receive direct money from taxpayers, like their US counterparts. And the federal government’s intervention didn’t go through Parliament, unlike the Congressional vote on TARP. But certain actions were taken by the federal government to keep the Canadian banks solvent. This is what happened:

The Canadian banks expanded credit well beyond their assets, supported and even encouraged by the setting of low interest rates by the central bank, the Bank of Canada. [ So, yes they DO have a central bank--just like us.]

This credit found its way into the economy by increased borrowing for capital projects, such as housing. Projects which never would have been started, or started at a later date, now became profitable. However, because these projects were funded by artificial credit (rather than legitimate savings), they constituted a malinvestment. They increased demand for production materials and for labour and caused prices to rise. This then caused an increase of prices of consumption goods.

Quote:
The Canadian Bankers Association (CBA) claims that in 2008, due to the crisis of confidence in global credit markets, some funding sources that banks normally relied upon became unavailable.To prevent a US-style catastrophe, the Canadian Mortgage Housing Corporation (owned by the federal government) bought $69 billion worth of mortgages off the Chartered Banks.

The left-wing Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives released a report earlier this year that found the Canadian banks receiving, “$114 billion in cash and loan support between September 2008 and August 2010. They were double-dipping in not only two but three separate support programs, one of them American.”

Both the Bank of Canada and the US Federal Reserve (as well as the Canadian federal government) were involved in what Harper called “liquidity support” but not a bailout. [ There's the two central or national banking institutions the OP's article doesn't clarify.]

The CBA claims it wasn’t a bailout because it wasn’t a solvency issue, like with the US banks. But this is faulty logic, as Daniel Tencer of the Huffington Post writes,...

Quote:
According to the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, the TD Bank received a $26 billion bailout, 69 per cent of the bank’s value at the time. Scotiabank got $25 billion, 100 per cent of the bank’s value at the time. RBC received $25 billion, 63 per cent of the bank’s value at the time. CIBC got $21 billion, an astonishing 148 per cent of the bank’s value at the time. And BMO received $17 billion in bailout money, 118 per cent of the bank’s value at the time.
Quote:
Bankruptcy is a necessary component of capitalism. It separates the losers from the winners. In a free society, banks wouldn’t have to be “chartered,” nor could they form an oligopoly. Competition would weed out the inefficient from the efficient and consumers would have a greater variety of services. A free banking system would lead to greater economic freedom. It would mark the end of the Bank of Canada’s monopoly of currency. A collapse of the Canadian financial sector may have been a precursor to this vision. Instead, malinvestments haven’t been liquidated, interest rates are still manipulated by central planners and propaganda about Canada’s “resilient” financial system has reached absurd proportions.

The Canadian Bank Bailout-Mises Canada
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